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Been and done all that.

You MAY be able (especially by discussion with your manager) be able to do the impossible, and get the best of both worlds - something I managed for a number of years - that is, to be a technical hands-on manager.

Yes, you do management stuff but you try and get the balance of doing about 50% management stuff (usually vague, short term thingies, firefighting, gazing into the possible future, or stuff that needs people problems to be sorted out). And about 50% being a hands-on developer.

There are many who will say "no no do not do this you muctmust be one of the other".

It is difficult, but one of the things about managing people doing technical work is that if you don't stay in touch, you rapidly become technically obsolete - and then you can NEVER go back to being a developer (or it requires a massive drop in pay, and a long retraining period with a tolerant employer).

The only way to remain moderately in touch with the technology is to DO IT. All the books, courses, and waffle in the world are no substitute for the real thing.

So by doing (some) development you make yourself a better manager of technical work.

But it is difficult.

Been and done all that.

You MAY be able (especially by discussion with your manager) be able to do the impossible, and get the best of both worlds - something I managed for a number of years - that is, to be a technical hands-on manager.

Yes, you do management stuff but you try and get the balance of doing about 50% management stuff (usually vague, short term thingies, firefighting, gazing into the possible future, or stuff that needs people problems to be sorted out). And about 50% being a hands-on developer.

There are many who will say "no no do not do this you muct be one of the other".

It is difficult, but one of the things about managing people doing technical work is that if you don't stay in touch, you rapidly become technically obsolete - and then you can NEVER go back to being a developer (or it requires a massive drop in pay, and a long retraining period with a tolerant employer).

The only way to remain moderately in touch with the technology is to DO IT. All the books, courses, and waffle in the world are no substitute for the real thing.

So by doing (some) development you make yourself a better manager of technical work.

But it is difficult.

Been and done all that.

You MAY be able (especially by discussion with your manager) be able to do the impossible, and get the best of both worlds - something I managed for a number of years - that is, to be a technical hands-on manager.

Yes, you do management stuff but you try and get the balance of doing about 50% management stuff (usually vague, short term thingies, firefighting, gazing into the possible future, or stuff that needs people problems to be sorted out). And about 50% being a hands-on developer.

There are many who will say "no no do not do this you must be one of the other".

It is difficult, but one of the things about managing people doing technical work is that if you don't stay in touch, you rapidly become technically obsolete - and then you can NEVER go back to being a developer (or it requires a massive drop in pay, and a long retraining period with a tolerant employer).

The only way to remain moderately in touch with the technology is to DO IT. All the books, courses, and waffle in the world are no substitute for the real thing.

So by doing (some) development you make yourself a better manager of technical work.

But it is difficult.

1
source | link

Been and done all that.

You MAY be able (especially by discussion with your manager) be able to do the impossible, and get the best of both worlds - something I managed for a number of years - that is, to be a technical hands-on manager.

Yes, you do management stuff but you try and get the balance of doing about 50% management stuff (usually vague, short term thingies, firefighting, gazing into the possible future, or stuff that needs people problems to be sorted out). And about 50% being a hands-on developer.

There are many who will say "no no do not do this you muct be one of the other".

It is difficult, but one of the things about managing people doing technical work is that if you don't stay in touch, you rapidly become technically obsolete - and then you can NEVER go back to being a developer (or it requires a massive drop in pay, and a long retraining period with a tolerant employer).

The only way to remain moderately in touch with the technology is to DO IT. All the books, courses, and waffle in the world are no substitute for the real thing.

So by doing (some) development you make yourself a better manager of technical work.

But it is difficult.