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As someone who learned Rails recently (as a hobby - never used it for commercial grade development) and had already worked in JEE and ASP.NET, Wayne MWayne M's answer rang very true.

Anyway, there is a subtle side to this which noone has mentioned yet, but which bothered me a bit with Rails - the strong reliance on convention over configuration.

Essentially, if you're used to "Find In Files"-driven orientation with a new code base, CoC is likely to annoy you when trying to pick up Rails. It's great for simple CRUD greenfields that are done precisely the Rails way (as Wayne M says), but for anything more unique and complicated, it'll be hard to work out what's going on if you try to work out the flow by searching for stuff in files to see how the plumbing is hooked up.

Though I think, this issue probably won't be as bad once you have a lot more experience with Rails. I can definitely see it being an issue for someone coming from oldskool Java/.NET web development who is used to a very verbose configuration flow - and is used to relying on seeing everything spelled out somewhere.

As someone who learned Rails recently (as a hobby - never used it for commercial grade development) and had already worked in JEE and ASP.NET, Wayne M's answer rang very true.

Anyway, there is a subtle side to this which noone has mentioned yet, but which bothered me a bit with Rails - the strong reliance on convention over configuration.

Essentially, if you're used to "Find In Files"-driven orientation with a new code base, CoC is likely to annoy you when trying to pick up Rails. It's great for simple CRUD greenfields that are done precisely the Rails way (as Wayne M says), but for anything more unique and complicated, it'll be hard to work out what's going on if you try to work out the flow by searching for stuff in files to see how the plumbing is hooked up.

Though I think, this issue probably won't be as bad once you have a lot more experience with Rails. I can definitely see it being an issue for someone coming from oldskool Java/.NET web development who is used to a very verbose configuration flow - and is used to relying on seeing everything spelled out somewhere.

As someone who learned Rails recently (as a hobby - never used it for commercial grade development) and had already worked in JEE and ASP.NET, Wayne M's answer rang very true.

Anyway, there is a subtle side to this which noone has mentioned yet, but which bothered me a bit with Rails - the strong reliance on convention over configuration.

Essentially, if you're used to "Find In Files"-driven orientation with a new code base, CoC is likely to annoy you when trying to pick up Rails. It's great for simple CRUD greenfields that are done precisely the Rails way (as Wayne M says), but for anything more unique and complicated, it'll be hard to work out what's going on if you try to work out the flow by searching for stuff in files to see how the plumbing is hooked up.

Though I think, this issue probably won't be as bad once you have a lot more experience with Rails. I can definitely see it being an issue for someone coming from oldskool Java/.NET web development who is used to a very verbose configuration flow - and is used to relying on seeing everything spelled out somewhere.

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As someone who learned Rails recently (as a hobby - never used it for commercial grade development) and had already worked in JEE and ASP.NET, Wayne M's answer rang very true.

Anyway, there is a subtle side to this which noone has mentioned yet, but which bothered me a bit with Rails - the strong reliance on convention over configuration.

Essentially, if you're used to "Find In Files"-driven orientation with a new code base, CoC is likely to annoy you when trying to pick up Rails. It's great for simple CRUD greenfields that are done precisely the Rails way (as Wayne M says), but for anything more unique and complicated, it'll be hard to work out what's going on if you try to work out the flow by searching for stuff in files to see how the plumbing is hooked up.

Though I think, this issue probably won't be as bad once you have a lot more experience with Rails. I can definitely see it being an issue for someone coming from oldskool Java/.NET web development who is used to a very verbose configuration flow - and is used to relying on seeing everything spelled out somewhere.