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Proposals for new Python features are collected in documents called PEPs (Python Enhancement Proposals). There's a master list at http://www.python.org/dev/peps/ which links to (for example):

It's great that proposals are published publicly for the community to read. However, how is the community supposed to participate? The pages don't allow comments.

It strikes me as weird the Python developers would make proposals public then deliberately exclude the community from discussion. Have I missed something?

In particular, I'd like to read other people's comments on http://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-0453/ and add my own.


For comparison, Ruby feature proposals are made as posts to its bug tracker. You can read everyone's comments below, and add your own (after making an account)

Nodejs feature requests are plain GitHub issues, which is probably the most inclusive. It's very easy to join GitHub and post a comment.

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Python PEPs are discussed on the Python-Dev mailinglist, which anyone is free to join.

There is a Gmane gateway for web reading too.

I do advice you to study the Python developer's guide before wading into any discussions, though. The contained FAQ has some entries on communication that cover new feature discussions as well.

The Python community formed in the early 1990, and the community established itself around mailinglists (built on the now-venerable Mailman list manager) and newsgroups (comp.lang.python is gatewayed to the python@mail.python.org list), and the model has worked well enough for this community.

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