-2

My question concerns deployment scripts in the process of continuous delivery.

Continuous delivery recommends that deployment scripts should be versioned into SCM just as normal code.

  • What is the best practice to avoid issues such as checking out (e.g. from Git) a script that does not have the right permission or is not executable?

  • Also, where in the SCM repository should deployment scripts be located?

  • 1
    Sharing your research helps everyone. Tell us what you've tried and why it didn’t meet your needs. This demonstrates that you’ve taken the time to try to help yourself, it saves us from reiterating obvious answers, and most of all it helps you get a more specific and relevant answer. Also see How to Ask – gnat Apr 6 '14 at 13:08
  • OK. I am in the process of editing my question. Bear with me... – balteo Apr 6 '14 at 13:11
  • I have posted an answer to my own question. @gnat: I did research but I was not able to find information relevant to this specific issue in the context of continuous delivery... – balteo Apr 6 '14 at 13:30
  • I was also looking for advice from people who have already met this problem in a real-life project and would share it with me here. – balteo Apr 6 '14 at 13:33
0

It must be noted that solutions to this issue are bound to be specific to the underlying technology.

Here is a couple of git and Unix-specific solutions that can serve as a source of inspiration for other SCMs and platforms:

Both rely on the following git command:

git update-index --chmod=+x $script

and git/bash aliases. See full post here: https://stackoverflow.com/a/22710807/536299

Regarding the question of the location in the SCM repository, it could be in a separate SCM repository or in a folder located with the source code.

  • 1
    How does that answer the question, where in the SCM the things should be located? I'm just asking ... ;-) – JensG Apr 6 '14 at 17:01

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.