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I recently pull up from under ten inches of dust one of my agile book. The book is now six years old; published in 2008. I prefer to keep it anonymous preventing to create a guerrilla of which one will yielded the best book about this subject. For that, I'm totally able to do a simple search from Amazon or Gooble to find the best book.

I seen a couple of books about agile released in the last 2-3 years and I'm wondering if it will be a good investment to buy a more recent book than my old one.

I mean, is there any great advancements in the last few years in the world of agile that worth to buy a more recent book?

Thank you.

closed as primarily opinion-based by gnat, Thomas Owens Aug 24 '14 at 20:14

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    I would actually advise you to look for even OLDER books. Look for the original books from Ken Schwaber, Kent Beck, Alistar Cockburn and so on. Look for the OLD and ORIGINAL stuff. The reason I say this is because Agile has become a marketing buzzword in our industry, and most companies are simply applying bastardized versions of the processes listed within Scrum/Lean/Whatever as management practices, just to say that they are Agile, with no regards to the actual change in culture and values that are necessary for both the customers and the team to enjoy the process. – MichelHenrich Aug 23 '14 at 23:18
  • Thank you for this advice. This is the answer that I looking for. Please, change this comment as an answer; I will surely marked it as accepted. – Samuel Aug 24 '14 at 0:10
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I would actually advise you to look for even OLDER books. Look for the original books from Ken Schwaber, Kent Beck, Alistar Cockburn and so on. Look for the OLD and ORIGINAL stuff. The reason I say this is because Agile has become a marketing buzzword in our industry, and most companies are simply applying bastardized versions of the processes listed within Scrum/Lean/Whatever as management practices, just to say that they are Agile, with no regards to the actual change in culture and values that are necessary for both the customers and the team to enjoy the process.

This is my opinion of course. But you can see in the following links that I'm not alone in this thought:

Half-Arsed Agile Manifesto: http://www.halfarsedagilemanifesto.org/

Prag Dave - Agile Is Dead: http://pragdave.me/blog/2014/03/04/time-to-kill-agile/

Robert C. Martin - The Land that Scrum Forgot - Article: https://www.scrumalliance.org/community/articles/2010/december/the-land-that-scrum-forgot

Robert C. Martin - The Land that Scrum Forgot - Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hG4LH6P8Syk

Martin Fowler - Flaccid Scrum: http://martinfowler.com/bliki/FlaccidScrum.html http://martinfowler.com/snips/201401291515.html

  • It is still just an opinion, but I edited to link to some articles and videos from people strongly associated with the original Agile Manifesto. If this is still not enough, just say the word and I'll delete the answer. ;) – MichelHenrich Aug 24 '14 at 19:33
  • your answer appears to be missing a reference to the half-arsed agile manifesto :) – gnat Aug 24 '14 at 20:54
  • I can't believe I didn't know about it yet :o Thanks, this will be very useful! – MichelHenrich Aug 24 '14 at 21:46

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