6

I am using darknet framework for object recognition listed here:

https://github.com/pjreddie/darknet

This is its license:

                                 YOLO LICENSE
                             Version 1, July 10 2015

THIS SOFTWARE LICENSE IS PROVIDED "ALL CAPS" SO THAT YOU KNOW IT IS SUPER
SERIOUS AND YOU DON'T MESS AROUND WITH COPYRIGHT LAW BECAUSE YOU WILL GET IN
TROUBLE HERE ARE SOME OTHER BUZZWORDS COMMONLY IN THESE THINGS WARRANTIES
LIABILITY CONTRACT TORT LIABLE CLAIMS RESTRICTION MERCHANTABILITY SUBJECT TO
THE FOLLOWING CONDITIONS:

1. #yolo
2. #swag
3. #blazeit

I don't understand neither the licence nor the strange logo.

have an idea about the explication of this licence and what kind of licenses it is (GPL, LGPL, BSD, MIT...)?

  • 4
    As much as I like @Sebastian's answer, which is legally correct, I would like to point out that this is less of a licence and more of a satire of software licencing – Caleth May 25 '16 at 8:45
13

The license means nothing at all, and gives you no rights to use the software or copy the code. Given the way copyright law works in most countries (author has copyright by default, and "you can't do anything with this" is the default consequence of copyright), this means you're technically not allowed to copy the code (including cloning the repository).

That said, given the wording the license was most likely written by someone who disdains copyright laws in general and therefore doesn't care about such things as software licenses; the chance of this person actually suing you is minimal. Still, I wouldn't use this in a commercial product, or even an open-source product that I expect to gain even a modest following of a few hundred people.

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  • 6
    The github ToS require the uploader to grant the right to clone, so assuming the upload was done by the author, cloning should be fine. – CodesInChaos May 24 '16 at 15:56
  • 1
    @CodesInChaos Just because you can clone doesn't mean you can use or modify the work. Fair use could possibly apply based on what you were doing, but that's about it. – Thomas Owens May 24 '16 at 16:16
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    @ThomasOwens Of course. I was only responding to "you're technically not allowed to copy the code (including cloning the repository)." – CodesInChaos May 24 '16 at 16:48
  • 5
    To get even more technical: this license doesn't give you a right to clone the repository. However, by creating the repository, the uploader has accepted the GitHub ToS that say that he implicitly grants a license to clone the repository. This is a separate license granted by virtue of the code being hosted on GitHub. If you had found the code somewhere, you would not be allowed to clone it. @CodesInChaos makes another subtle point: if the person who owns the repository is not the author, then he is forced by the GitHub ToS to grant you the right to clone, but he doesn't actually have… – Jörg W Mittag May 24 '16 at 21:38
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    … the right to grant that right! That means, you do not have the right to clone, because the person who gave you that right doesn't actually have the right to give you that right. However, you will most likely not be liable for damages, because you acted in good faith. (That is, assuming you don't know that the uploader isn't the author, should that in fact be the case.) Isn't copyright law fun? – Jörg W Mittag May 24 '16 at 21:40
5

The license has been updated on June, 29 2016, probably in order to address some of the points discussed by Sebastian Redl. The YOLO license v2 releases the work in the public domain:

                              YOLO LICENSE
                         Version 2, July 29 2016

THIS SOFTWARE LICENSE IS PROVIDED "ALL CAPS" SO THAT YOU KNOW IT IS SUPER
SERIOUS AND YOU DON'T MESS AROUND WITH COPYRIGHT LAW BECAUSE YOU WILL GET IN
TROUBLE HERE ARE SOME OTHER BUZZWORDS COMMONLY IN THESE THINGS WARRANTIES
LIABILITY CONTRACT TORT LIABLE CLAIMS RESTRICTION MERCHANTABILITY. NOW HERE'S
THE REAL LICENSE:

0. Darknet is public domain.
1. Do whatever you want with it.
2. Stop emailing me about it!
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