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I created a Python package and licensed it under GPLv3. When I created an account on PyPI, I had to agree to the following:

The PSF is free to use or disseminate any content that I upload on an unrestricted basis for any purpose. In particular, the PSF and all other users of the web site are granted an irrevocable, worldwide, royalty-free, nonexclusive license to reproduce, distribute, transmit, display, perform, and publish the content, including in digital form.

You can read essentially the same thing at python.org/about/legal:

The PSF is free to use or disseminate such content on an unrestricted basis for any purpose, and third party content providers grant the PSF and all other users of the web site an irrevocable, worldwide, royalty-free, nonexclusive license to reproduce, distribute, transmit, display, perform, and publish such content, including in digital form.

Is this compatible with GPLv3? By publishing my code on PyPI, do lose the copyleft protections that GPLv3 affords me?

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No. The key word here is "nonexclusive" license.

It means that you're granting them the right to distribute your code, (which is the entire point of putting it up on a package manager,) without setting up any sort of exclusive deal or transfer of rights with them. And as the license is to distribute your code, rather than to use it, it doesn't conflict with the copyleft restrictions of the GPL, which relate to how the code is used. People who download your code over a package manager still have to use it in accordance with the license terms that you published it under.

  • Copyright/copyleft restrictions come into play regardless if PSF uses the software or not. – whatsisname Jul 1 '16 at 2:37
  • @whatsisname Sure. The point I was making is that this particular license under discussion is about PSF distributing the code rather than about them using the code, which is the province of the GPL. If they also decide to use it, they would have to do so according to the GPL, and their license from the author to distribute the code has no real bearing on that. – Mason Wheeler Jul 1 '16 at 9:04
  • @Mason I think the PSF can use the software and ignore the GPL. Not only does the agreement give everyone the right to distribute, but it also gives the PSF the right to use it "on an unrestricted basis for any purpose". It's before the "in particular" clause. – dln385 Jul 1 '16 at 14:25

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