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I'm coding along with the examples in Build Awesome Command-Line Applications in Ruby 2 I'm using git and storing my code on github. The example code can be found on the pragmatic bookshelf site. They mention:

Copyrights apply to this source code. You may use the source code in your own projects, however the source code may not be used to create training material, courses, books, articles, and the like. We make no guarantees that this source code is fit for any purpose.

But there is no license in the code I downloaded. Whenever I start any project I just slap a GPL on it and call it a day. I'm not trying to sell it or create a training manual, but I would like to write about the project on a blog, which might be considered an article. So I'm curious, what should I do?

Edit:

Digging around in the legal section I found the following:

You agree to be bound by our license regarding source code and program listings available on this site.

But I'm still not sure what that means. What I'm asking is, where the heck is the license?

➜  code ls
Gemfile             be_easy_to_use      break_rules         have_a_purpose      make_config_easy    play_well
be_easy_to_maintain be_helpful          cli_tools_roundup   install_remove      make_easy_possible  tolerate_gracefully
➜  code find . | grep -i license
➜  code

edit:

See below

  • First time I see some "non-educational" license. I'd say just avoid using that code completely as you'd be clearly violating it. Plus you can't slap the GPL on it, I think, because it's not really compatible with those terms. If you're still unsure, ask a layer. – Mario Sep 10 '16 at 5:10
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    The license is for educational material. So, it's more of a "non-compete" license, and that's actually not that uncommon. But yeah, GPL is definitely not compatible, and neither is CC BY-SA 3.0. – Jörg W Mittag Sep 10 '16 at 8:08
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If you wrote the code yourself, put whatever license you want on it.

If you didn't write the code yourself, but downloaded and used it, it isn't your code to relicense. You must follow the owner's license.

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But there is no license in the code I downloaded.

[…]

What I'm asking is, where the heck is the license?

You posted it:

Copyrights apply to this source code. You may use the source code in your own projects, however the source code may not be used to create training material, courses, books, articles, and the like. We make no guarantees that this source code is fit for any purpose.

That's the license.

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  • It's easy as that! ;) – Thomas Junk Sep 10 '16 at 13:28
  • hmm wow, that's a new for me. I've always thought of a license as a big long text file that I include in my projects, but it sounds like a license can be any statements about the work. Am I understanding you on this? – mbigras Sep 10 '16 at 15:22
  • A license can be in any form. Just like, say, a sales contract. When was the last time you signed a sales contract for a glass of beer in a pub? Never, probably. And yet, you have entered into a contract probably hundreds of times. – Jörg W Mittag Sep 11 '16 at 15:41
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Problem seems solved:

Digging around more on dave's github, it looks like the code is licensed under the creative commons license which seems to basically mean:

* Share — copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format
* Adapt — remix, transform, and build upon the material
* The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms.

Under the following terms:

* Attribution — You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.
* NonCommercial — You may not use the material for commercial purposes.
* ShareAlike — If you remix, transform, or build upon the material, you must distribute your contributions under the same license as the original.
* No additional restrictions — You may not apply legal terms or technological measures that legally restrict others from doing anything the license permits.

So I think the solution is, I'm going to make a LICENSE.txt with a link to the CC3.0 and make sure to give dave credit for the code, not sell it, and sleep easy :)

Check out the repo, thoughts and opinions about the legality of this are welcome.

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