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TLDR;

I'd like to add a (modification) copyright and a MIT License to an Apache 2 licensed file, which I modified.

Description

I modified a file that was licensed Apache 2. According to what I understand I had to do the following:

  1. include the license
  2. include the copyright
  3. stated the changes that I made
  4. I did not include a Notice, because I don't know what that is or what it should contain.

Now I would like to add my copyright and an MIT license to that modified file. In my specific case the example would be as follows:

/*
 * Copyright 2014 Julian Shen
 *
 * Licensed under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (the "License");
 * you may not use this file except in compliance with the License.
 * You may obtain a copy of the License at
 *
 *     http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0
 *
 * Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing, software
 * distributed under the License is distributed on an "AS IS" BASIS,
 * WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, either express or implied.
 * See the License for the specific language governing permissions and
 * limitations under the License.
 */

/*

  Changes made to the original file:
  - Changed CircleTransform to CutOutTriangleTransform


  MIT License

  Moficiations copyright (c) 2017 Elyasin Shaladi

  Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and
  associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction,
  including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute,
  sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is
  furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

  The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or
  substantial portions of the Software.

  THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT
  NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND
  NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM,
  DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM,
  OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.
 */

Question

Is this OK to do so?

closed as off-topic by Bart van Ingen Schenau, user22815, Thomas Owens Mar 24 '17 at 13:18

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for legal advice or aid are off-topic here. You may be able to get help with understanding, applying, and complying with free and open licenses on Open Source. You may be able to get help with legal terms, concepts, language, and procedures on Law." – Bart van Ingen Schenau, Community, Thomas Owens
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1

Perhaps this question might be worth a read. This might get tricky, especially if you are not the original author, or if you are indeed the original author but other people contributed non-trivial patches.

I remember when the Mercurial project changed license: since I had contributed a couple of trivial patches a couple of years before, I got an email from Matt Mackall asking if I was okay with it.

This is really a question you should ask to a lawyer, though.

If you don't mind me asking: why would you want to change this file's license? Is there something you absolutely want to do with it that the Apache license disallows?

  • Very good question. I did not realize. I got the habit to use the MIT license in all my project files, and thought how do I put an MIT license in such a file? Without actually thinking whether it is necessary or not... I feel like I am overdoing it now... – Ely Mar 10 '17 at 7:34

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