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I developed 2 games in C++ using SDL. Without using any wrappers. I literally loved and enjoyed every part of the journey. Complex algorithms, how 2D works, rendering, audio, input etc. But i am not too good at maths and specially physics.

PS: There are drag and drop tools and IDE available for game development, i am not talking about them, i love low level programming specially C++ and assembly.

closed as off-topic by gnat, Philipp, Doval, FrustratedWithFormsDesigner, amon May 26 '17 at 19:10

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions seeking career or education advice are off topic here. They are only meaningful to the asker and do not generate lasting value for the broader community. Furthermore, in most cases, any answer is going to be a subjective opinion that may not take into account all the nuances of a (your) particular circumstance." – gnat, Philipp, Doval, FrustratedWithFormsDesigner, amon
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  • While off-topic, I would encourage you to consider something that I only realized when I went back to college to study computing: all those algorithms, data structures, and logic? That's actually math. You have way more mathematical aptitude and knowledge than you think, it's just that you acquired it in a way you didn't recognize as math, because it isn't hand-performed algebra or calculus. Discrete Math, Algorithms, Logic, Boolean Algebra, Topology, and more - if you you can get past them mental block of thinking you aren't good at math, I bet you'll be surprised how far you can go. – BrianH May 26 '17 at 21:58
  • @BrianHall very true. Once you learn abstraction, everything else is details. ;) – candied_orange May 27 '17 at 4:36
  • @BrianHall such a generous answer! thanks i will explore more. – Mohammad Sheriyar Sid Jun 2 '17 at 22:05
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You're looking for a physics engine. You can learn just enough math to use it. You don't have to make your own. They do neat things like collisions, gravity, and Brownian motion. They can be a lot of fun when used well. Don't ask us to recommend one. We don't do that here.

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