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I have a highest-level diagram / map / picture of connected networks where internet is pictured as a cloud, some physical machines, firewall, switches etc which describe an overview of the "ecosystem" / at large scale.

Is there a name for such a diagram?

It might not make a difference that this particular diagram doesn't display many software servers, mostly physical machines and networks. In these diagrams if there is a database it is usually depicted as a cylinder (looks like a storage can).

It is not a sequence diagram, not a use-case diagram and not a class diagram. Is it even an UML diagram?

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    Architecture diagram?
    – Ewan
    Jul 13, 2017 at 17:31
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    Please note that this falls under the category of "name this well-known concept with an objective answer."
    – user22815
    Jul 13, 2017 at 17:34
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    Distributed Computing Environment Diagram...with DCE services include: Remote Procedure Calls (RPC),Security Service,Directory Service,Time Service,Threads Service and Distributed File Service
    – quintumnia
    Jul 13, 2017 at 18:01

2 Answers 2

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I am not aware of a UML diagram for this, but in my experience this is simply called a "network diagram." I have seen probably hundreds of them throughout my career. While I have seen some variations on them, they typically look like this:

enter image description here

Source: Network Diagrams: An Agile Introduction

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Yes, it's a network diagram :) Network diagrams can be any level of detail and you don't have to have every endpoint on the diagram. What you describe is typically a WAN or site-to-site diagram showing how traffic routes between sites, with each site actually representing an entire network of devices. According to this site, there is not a standard for representing network architecture in UML:

http://www.uml-diagrams.org/network-architecture-diagrams.html

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