-1

So I started a month ago at relatively small company (12 people in the building) as a junior developer without professional experience apart from my own (7 years) and no degree. We're building a JEE app that's been going on for 15 years, and for the next version it was decided we would rebuild the frontend, removing frames/iframes/JSP and using a restish API. They also decided that we would use ExtJS as a framework. I just started discovering it and here is what I thought:

  • They have a large, although far from exhaustive, base of available components

However:

  • The framework provides poor information over encountered errors. For instance, it doesn't test the type of data sent to classes, leading to cryptic x is not a function where a proper framework like react would have said x is y expected a z.
  • The community is small and googling errors is often useless, so you are left helpless / requiring a senior dev's help
  • The UI looks like shit. Seriously. Their icons are ugly. Their buttons are just rectangles. They have a poor choice of colors. Do the even have a designer? A six years-old could have done a but better job.
  • The underlying mechanics are not obvious: scopes are unclear, what a single param will effectively do is unclear...

I'm not the only one feeling that way, our intern webdesigner agrees.I'd like to bring this up to my manager, I think if I brought it up the right way he would listen. Although, it's not the first time I talked about technology choices (we still use CVS and we don't use any build tool like maven) but I do believe that the technology choice, when rebuilding from the ground, is a matter of importance and going off the wrong foot might be detrimental.

I already asked why they would choose ExtJS over React/angular etc and it seems because - our headquarters like extjs, and already paid for it - licensing might cause issue with another approch (since we would need several libs) - tech debt could be an issue (eg Angular versionning)

closed as off-topic by gnat, 17 of 26, David Arno, Euphoric, Doc Brown Nov 6 '18 at 15:06

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions seeking career or education advice are off topic here. They are only meaningful to the asker and do not generate lasting value for the broader community. Furthermore, in most cases, any answer is going to be a subjective opinion that may not take into account all the nuances of a (your) particular circumstance." – gnat, 17 of 26, David Arno, Euphoric, Doc Brown
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 3
    I like that people feel the need to downvote but they pass on actually doing something useful like explaining – Vinz243 Nov 6 '18 at 13:54
  • 2
    As it stands, this is very much a career-related question. As the question guidelines state, "Questions seeking career or education advice are off topic here. They are only meaningful to the asker and do not generate lasting value for the broader community. Furthermore, in most cases, any answer is going to be a subjective opinion that may not take into account all the nuances of a (your) particular circumstance". Thus the downvotes. – David Arno Nov 6 '18 at 14:07
  • 4
    Sorry, but we cannot help you in the way you expect. Right now, the question sounds like you trying to find validation for you being right and them being wrong. We cannot answer that. If you want ways to help you convince your coworkers to use specific technology or process over any other, then that should go to workplace.stackexchange . Reason why you struggle so much is that people rarelly listen to reason and arguments, prefering their own experience and feelings. And that is wholy unrelated to software development. – Euphoric Nov 6 '18 at 14:10
  • Thanks for pointing me the right way! Sorry for wrong place. Just vote for closing then – Vinz243 Nov 6 '18 at 14:20
3

I want to highlight a couple of points from your question, I hope that highlighting these will help answer:

  • I started a month ago
  • our headquarters like extjs
  • already paid for it

You're the new guy on the team, a team which has been working on a product for 15 years. Chances are that they are already far more aware of these limitations than you are, there's also a good chance that your manager was one of the developers who worked on the team.

To swap out a UI framework is a big job. There needs to be a significant business reason to do it to justify the cost (estimate the time it would take the team to upskill/develop in angular and multiply by the average salary).

I suspect many people you're talking to will be responding in one of two ways. Either they'll know entirely the limitations of what they're using and have been making the same argument as you for years (and failing) or, they are invested (or have been told) that the existing framework is the one to use (for financial or cross team purposes).

My suggestions:

  • Understand (I mean really understand) the benefits of any new framework
  • Understand the benefits of changing
  • Show that financially it makes more sense to change than to stick

I also suggest reading Driving Technical Change - it's a good book!

  • 1
    To swap out a UI framework is a big job: we used jQuery, and we just started a draft (without any logic) with extjs. I wouldn't ask for it if it wasn't the case. – Vinz243 Nov 6 '18 at 14:19
  • 3
    Swapping out an established UI framework is a pain, true. All the more reason to do it now, before work has properly started. And ExtJS is ancient. It’s truly painfully obsolete. – Konrad Rudolph Nov 6 '18 at 14:23

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.