-3

I want to build a web application in Java on Tomcat server (I am open to change the type of server if needed) The requirement for me is for the user to be able to login and download sensitive data (think bank app and downloading of statement). These should be done through RESTful communication. So obviously security is main concern here

Also, the webserver will be running a daily job that will update a database entry (say timestamp).

Here is what I am thinking: - Use Tomcat server with SSL certificate. - Use Springboot, RESTeasy, OR pure Servlets for framework - User Hibernate for DB - Use MySQL DB

Does this stack sound right? Would you recommend one way or the other especially when it comes to the Java side of things? Perhaps there is a nice library that does all that!

Last time I did web application was few years back so I could be outdated

Thank you

closed as off-topic by Eric King, Robert Harvey, Erik Eidt, gnat, Jörg W Mittag Dec 20 '18 at 6:48

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking us to find or recommend tools, libraries, programming languages, resources (including books, blogs, tutorials, and examples), or projects to undertake are off-topic here as they attract opinionated answers that won't have lasting value to others. You may be able to get help in The Whiteboard, our chat room." – Eric King, Jörg W Mittag
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
    This looks like a tools selection question, likely off-topic here. You don't strictly need all those tools to do what you want. But you can succeed with the stack you describe. – joshp Dec 20 '18 at 1:57
0

Does this stack sound right?

Sure, given you know what you're doing with modern REST APIs over HTTP (ie. security, performance, scalability, etc).

I would like to add to this answer though that this is a big topic, and there's more to it than can be found in a StackExchange post. I'm a Java Spring developer by trade, so I'll point you to Baeldung: my favourite resource for learning Spring essentials. No matter what stack you go with though, I would suggest taking your time to learn about modern standards and methodologies to ensure you're creating something that can handle itself in production.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.