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I thought this might be a thing to happen regularly, but I might be wrong. I have a process that is quite clear in its structure.

But: We are in a multi-provider environment and at the very beginning of the process, the actor himself does not know what meta-role he is in. I am not talking about the roles within the pool. I am talking about a provider-consumer-relationship.

So at first the actor has to determine: Am I consumer or provider? Then proceed. - Of course this could be done as a fork within a pool. But I want to show the interaction between consumer and provider in one diagram, therefore two pools, one for the provider, one for the consumer. But the process could start in either pool depending on the real-life situation.

Now my idea was to add a third pool, like a "I do not know yet which meta-role I am in". So that a real-life one process be split up into two. But is that "correct", or are there other solutions thinkable?

I hope this is not too exotic :)

EDIT: This would be the process if you just wanted to walk it through:

enter image description here

But this is what we need because we want to show how the interaction takes place. And yes, in a way that is some exercise artificiality, because we depict our view in parallel which never happens. But thus the intertwining/fitting together gets shown to the addressees:

enter image description here

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    Just to clarify this question a bit: BPMN = Business Process Modeling Notation, and a "pool" is a specific element within that graphical representation of a program model. However, I think that this question remains vague. Commented Feb 20 at 8:46
  • Sorry for that. - Well we do have "sense-making" pool for provider and consumer. Those are separate entities. So depending on what (as i called it:) meta role you are in, you are in the pool consumer or provider. Issue is, that you do not know that right hand before the whole process (of i.e. an incident ticket) begins.
    – MaK
    Commented Feb 20 at 8:59

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Every pool starts off with its own preconditions in mind and acts on a certain level of abstraction. For example, let's look at:

enter image description here [File:FlexDiagrams BPMN display.png - Wikimedia Commons]

We did not start with a customer walking into a shop, grabbing a doorhandle, or typing in email address - it's all implied and is irrelevant to this diagram.

If choosing the role is not trivial and you want to explicate it - it deserves its own pool. Alternatively, if you can abstract it away to another place (e.g. own diagram) and start with already defined roles - do that.

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    "abstract it away" - love it - will use it. I will asap add a graphical edit to my main question to elaborate on it.
    – MaK
    Commented Feb 20 at 9:52
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Thanks for you input!

We actually opted for the idea with subprocesses (2nd picture) but then as real subprocesses, not distinct, new pools. Pro: correct. Con: we have to show "our" process split up in subprocesses as main branches. But we are ok with that.

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