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W3Schools has a reputation of being incomplete, sometimes incorrect, and ridden with advertising; still, when looking to look up some things or link to documentation when answering a SO question, it still is the only handy cross-browser resource.

There are other resources like the Mozilla Developer Network that is doing an increasingly great job documenting JavaScript, and the legendary and great Quirksmode. But they, as brilliant as they are, cover only parts of the areas I am talking about, and provide no community editing and quality control options.

Is anybody aware of efforts to create a collaboratively edited, cross-browser HTML/CSS/JavaScript/DOM encyclopedia? If you will, I'm thinking of a challenger to W3Schools like SO was to Experts Exchange.

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4 Answers 4

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I am not aware of one.

But I am aware of what appears to be a reasonably thorough list of inaccuracies that can be found at w3schools.

Also, the Mozilla Document Center is a community-editable wiki and is already off to a good start as a knowledge base.

Check out the MDC's Content, all user editable:

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  • The MDC docs look really nice, hadn't seen se HTML and CSS refs yet! Also they are increasingly losing the Mozilla focus which is great.
    – Pekka
    Feb 19, 2011 at 15:41
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WebPlatform.org sounds like what you want.

Web Platform is an open community of developers building resources for a better web, regardless of brand, browser or platform. Anyone can contribute to the reference, by collaborating in the wiki documentation pages, asking and answering questions in the Q&A forum, sharing and commenting on the WebPlatform blog posts, and communicating through the IRC chat channel.

WebPlatform was convened by W3C, that is seeking to create an online reference of Web standards. The project is a collaboration among Adobe, Apple, Facebook, Google, HP, Microsoft, Mozilla, Nokia, Opera, and W3C. There are currently efforts under-way to migrate the data from sources like MDN into WebPlatform.

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    would you mind explaining more on what it does and why do you recommend it as answering the question asked? "Link-only answers" are not quite welcome at Stack Exchange
    – gnat
    May 21, 2013 at 22:02
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    Gnat, I have updated the post with more information and marked as community wiki in case anyone feels like providing more info. I think it is definitely the solution OP is asking for.
    – zuallauz
    May 21, 2013 at 23:21
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For CSS, take a look at the CSS-Discuss Wiki. It's an adjunct to the long-standing (and highly-regarded) CSS-Discuss mailing list.

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    Very nice, never heard of this. Good stuff.
    – Pekka
    Feb 19, 2011 at 15:41
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The best of specific information about working cross-browser code often resides in blogs. As the blogger wrote on a very specific subjects he knows well, it is more likely to work. this doesn't work. Plus, the page is probably update quite often (if not, it will get kicked down by search engines, and you'll never get across it).

So, when I look for something specific and want it to be cross-browser, I just ask Google...

(css/html/javascript) [what I want to do] cross-browser

...and the matching result is almost always on the first page.

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