Linked Questions

48
votes
10answers
12k views

Why are exceptions considered better than explicit error testing? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Defensive Programming vs Exception Handling? if/else statements or exceptions I often come across heated blog posts where the author uses the argument: "exceptions vs ...
24
votes
9answers
33k views

if/else statements or exceptions [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Defensive Programming vs Exception Handling? I don't know, that this question fit better on this site, or Stack Overflow, but because my question is connected rather to ...
8
votes
3answers
452 views

Would it be better to have extra checks, or would it be a waste of time? [duplicate]

In your opinion, do you think it is a waste of time to make checks that you know there is no possible way of it being there/not being there, or would you just put it there just in case there is a bug ...
-3
votes
2answers
802 views

Why ever use exception throw (in C#) except for Class Library development? [duplicate]

Why would I ever throw exceptions in code? (except for one specific scenario where I am developing a class library which the consumers of it, will not want / be able to change). To be more specific, ...
47
votes
8answers
15k views

Why design a modern language without an exception-handling mechanism?

Many modern languages provide rich exception handling features, but Apple's Swift programming language does not provide an exception handling mechanism. Steeped in exceptions as I am, I'm having ...
29
votes
7answers
6k views

Should a C++ program catch all exceptions and prevent exceptions from bubbling up past main()?

I was once advised that a C++ program should ultimately catch all exceptions. The reasoning given at the time was essentially that programs which allow exceptions to bubble up outside of main() enter ...
12
votes
2answers
1k views

How should I handle logger failures?

In several of our company's applications, we use a custom logger. It's fairly robust, though we may replace it with something like NLog in the future. One of the logger's tasks is to log any ...
1
vote
5answers
716 views

Limits of Defensive Programming acknowledging that Exception Handling should be avoided

I've read Defensive Programming vs Exception Handling? and if/else statements or exceptions, but none contain something relevant to what I'm searching for. Taking into account that exception handling ...
3
votes
4answers
546 views

Is it possible/good idea to reduce chance of crashing by catching Error?

I have a class the implements A which will run a certain method of class B. There is a requirement that this A should never crash when running this operation (which is not possible, right?). To ...
0
votes
2answers
570 views

Exception Handling: When and Why?

The main languages I use are C++ and Java. Both languages support exception handling. I confess, I may not actually understand exception handling, at least, I certainly don't understand why you ...
0
votes
1answer
92 views

Sending Out Functions To Return Or To Die

Which is preferable for both solid technique and secure coding? Example #1: function_one() blah; function_two() blah; print blah; exit; ... Example #2: ...
1
vote
1answer
408 views

Is a General Exception In Addition To Expected Exceptions Defensive or Unecessary?

I have read this and this and this: if my question misses the point in those answers, please point it out and we'll get this one deleted. These questions indicate that this may actually be a bad thing ...
0
votes
1answer
162 views

The Same Behavior for Boolean and Exception

The following code uses a boolean preference active: In the active state, it does an operation which could throw an exception. On this exception, it does fall back to the non-active state. let active ...
0
votes
2answers
132 views

Should methods perform checks that they accomplished the task they were built for? or should they just throw an exception?

What are some pro's and con's of validating your performed the task intended? public static bool UploadFile(string filename) { // 1. upload the file // 2. check to see if the file now exist ...