Linked Questions

118
votes
11answers
17k views

One-line functions that are called only once

Consider a parameterless (edit: not necessarily) function that performs a single line of code, and is called only once in the program (though it is not impossible that it'll be needed again in the ...
44
votes
8answers
9k views

When is it appropriate to make a separate function when there will only ever be a single call to said function? [duplicate]

We are designing coding standards, and are having disagreements as to if it is ever appropriate to break code out into separate functions within a class, when those functions will only ever be called ...
46
votes
6answers
4k views

Refactoring into lots of methods - is this considered clean or not? [duplicate]

So, I watched as my colleague complained a bit about a project he has inherited from someone who is, shall we say, not very experienced as a programmer (intern left to his own devices on a project). ...
28
votes
6answers
4k views

Should I extract specific functionality into a function and why?

I have a large method which does 3 tasks, each of them can be extracted into a separate function. If I'll make an additional functions for each of that tasks, will it make my code better or worse and ...
15
votes
5answers
1k views

Is this pattern bad? [duplicate]

I notice that when I code I often use a pattern that calls a class method and that method will call a number of private functions in the same class to do the work. The private functions do one thing ...
4
votes
8answers
385 views

Creating one-line method for the single purpose of self-documenting code [duplicate]

Given the following two snippets: Snippet 1: public void foo(Data data, AbstractNode node) { int originalId = data.getCurrentId; node.execute(data); //If node changed currentId reset it ...
3
votes
3answers
341 views

Making some methods mostly contain method calls, while others doing “the lowest level” work [duplicate]

So I thought about this, and I don't know if it's included or not in any methodology. I think the advantages of this coding style is that, at the lowest level, the code is extremely testable, and ...
1
vote
2answers
376 views

Using Functions for Never-Repeated Code [duplicate]

What are some best practices for using functions to break up large blocks of code into discrete chunks of logic when those functions are only ever going to be used once within the lifetime of a ...
0
votes
3answers
234 views

Should simple tasks be divided into separate functions? [duplicate]

If I have to write a simple program (25-35 lines), should I divide it even further, in functions which have a few lines and get executed max. 2 times, or to put it all im one? e.g. if I need to add ...
139
votes
6answers
13k views

Are private methods with a single reference bad style?

Generally I use private methods to encapsulate functionality that is reused in multiple places in the class. But sometimes I have a large public method that could be broken up into smaller steps, each ...
29
votes
8answers
7k views

Is splitting up a function into several inner functions an anti-pattern? [duplicate]

Imagine a long and complicated process, which is started by calling function foo(). There are several consecutive steps in this process, each of them depending on result of the previous step. The ...
18
votes
11answers
2k views

Why are we supposed to use short functions to sectionalize our code? [duplicate]

I've seen an increasing trend in the programming world saying that it is good practice to separate code blocks into their own functions. Obviously, if that code block is reusable, you should do that. ...
27
votes
6answers
2k views

Method extraction vs underlying assumptions

When I split big methods (or procedures, or functions — this question is not specific to OOP, but since I work in OOP languages 99% of the time, it's the terminology that I'm most comfortable with) ...
10
votes
3answers
8k views

Should a method do one thing and be good at it? [duplicate]

"Extract Till You Drop" is someting I've read in Uncle Bob's blog, meaning that a method should do one thing alone be good at it. What is that one thing? When should you stop extracting methods? ...
8
votes
2answers
669 views

How do you call the process of taking a part of a function and making an individual function of it?

I know there was a technical term for this. I'm just can't remember what it was. If the title needs clarification, here is what I mean; If this is the old code: Result foobar(Param1,Param2,Param3) { ...

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