Linked Questions

3 votes
0 answers
2k views

Argument over performance using Convert.ChangeType in Web Applications [duplicate]

A debate has been going on at work about using Convert.ChangeType. A couple of fundamental assumptions to this discussion are delineated below: 1. The discussion is within the context of web ...
user avatar
  • 287
63 votes
17 answers
35k views

Why use an OO approach instead of a giant "switch" statement?

I am working in a .Net, C# shop and I have a coworker that keeps insisting that we should use giant Switch statements in our code with lots of "Cases" rather than more object oriented approaches. His ...
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27 votes
6 answers
17k views

In general, is it worth using virtual functions to avoid branching?

There seems to be rough equivalents of instructions to equate to the cost of a branch miss virtual functions have a similar tradeoff: instruction vs. data cache miss optimization barrier If you ...
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8 votes
6 answers
2k views

performance versus reusability

How can I write functions that are reusable without sacrificing performance? I am repeatedly coming up against the situation where I want to write a function in a way that makes it reusable (e.g. it ...
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  • 189
11 votes
4 answers
799 views

How to document and teach others "optimized beyond recognition" computationally intensive code?

Occasionally there is the 1% of code that is computationally intensive enough that needs the heaviest kind of low-level optimization. Examples are video processing, image processing, and all kinds of ...
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  • 16.4k
3 votes
6 answers
712 views

Is it better to write an efficient algorithm or code that is easier to understand?

So I was recently given a coding assignment from a large financial firm, and I thought of two ways to solve the problem. One of the ways involved 1 outer for loop and 1 inner for loop. In this case, ...
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  • 89
3 votes
2 answers
309 views

Place variables frequently used by the same function on the heap?

Say that I have the following situation: void myFunc() { int x; //Do something with x } "x" is placed on the stack which is no doubt fast. Now, "myFunc" is called very frequently, lets say ...
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  • 159
1 vote
5 answers
822 views

Avoiding exceptions for performance optimization

In our code base, I see a lot of code like this var error = ValidatePhoneNumber(userId, phoneNumber); //if validation fails, return error if(!string.IsNullOrEmpty(error)) { return error; } If I ...
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2 votes
1 answer
315 views

How to balance 'efficient' vs 'clean' code? [closed]

I have been coding in python for a little over a year, and I have learned a lot and developed quite a few applications, in the process. I do not program for my profession, I simply program ...
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-1 votes
2 answers
398 views

conciseness to speed ratio [closed]

In general, the more concise & flexible a language is the slower is the execution of programs written in this language. on the other side, the fast languages are mostly overly verbose, requiring ...
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  • 115
1 vote
2 answers
288 views

How to declare and share a lot of variables to provide best performance

My question is not about dilemma between clean code vs performance, but I want to understand exact issue with declaring variables and sharing them between functions. I read in many threads, that from ...
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  • 123
-3 votes
2 answers
2k views

What is well written code? [closed]

Is code that runs fast but written with a bad and hard to understand syntax, good code? Is code that runs slowly but written with a good and easy to understand syntax, good code?
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-1 votes
1 answer
165 views

Drawing the Line between Coding Style and Algorithm [closed]

Formatting with Indentations, White spaces, and New Lines obviously fit into the coding style category. if (a == b) { foo(); } // vs if (a == b) { foo(); } On the other hand, something ...
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  • 163