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Android is Google's open source OS and system for smart phones and tablets. Use this tag for software engineering questions about Android; for user questions, visit our sister site Android Enthusiasts Stack Exchange.

2
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According to this and this, the Android emulator does not support multitouch, although single-touch gestures should still be possible. …
answered Jan 7 '11 by Robert Harvey
4
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No. REST has to do with working with resources over the Internet; LocalHost doesn't really qualify as such, unless perhaps you're running a web server on LocalHost. Google Volley is a client-side li …
answered Apr 15 '16 by Robert Harvey
4
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You need to write and deploy a REST service which your Android app can communicate with. There are a number of ways you can accomplish that: ASP.NET MVC, Web API, WCF, etc. The REST service …
answered Jul 8 '14 by Robert Harvey
1
vote
You don't have to put anything at all into your Help/About dialog, nor are you compelled to put specific things in there by any external authority. What you put into the Help/About dialog is entirely …
answered Nov 27 '16 by Robert Harvey
2
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The benefit is reuse. You can reuse a fragment in different activities, just like the documentation says. Imagine an address block on an invoice and a packing list. The invoice and the packing li …
answered Jun 5 '13 by Robert Harvey
1
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Why do most people send just a string to a php page, instead of a JSON object? Probably because they just need to send one item of data; usually it's an ID, like a Customer ID. JSON is a structured …
answered Mar 8 '13 by Robert Harvey
2
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How it works is fully explained here. Unfortunately, it's mostly implemented in the compiler. You might be able to do it by implementing a state machine and some lambda expressions, but by the time yo …
answered Aug 6 '14 by Robert Harvey
1
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Oracle says: Why Use Nested Classes? There are several compelling reasons for using nested classes, among them: It is a way of logically grouping classes that are only used in one p …
answered Aug 15 '13 by Robert Harvey
0
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You have three options for storage on an Android device: Shared Preferences Shared Preferences is a Key/Value store, intended to store a small amount of settings type data. It supports primitive …
answered May 3 '16 by Robert Harvey
4
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work for any platform. That compiler takes C# as input, and produces IL as its output. There is one CLR written per platform. When they say that Mono has been ported to Android, what they mostly mean … is that a CLR was written for Android. The Class Library (equivalent to the .NET Framework on a Windows system) is written mostly (if not entirely) in C# and IL, and since C# compiles to IL, the Framework should already be compatible. …
answered Jan 6 by Robert Harvey
1
vote
The purpose of the MV* patterns is primarily to provide separation of concerns between the UI and the rest of the system. Your Audio Player Service, if it also includes the player, uses the entire pa …
answered May 16 '15 by Robert Harvey
8
votes
In general, unless you're specifically designing your classes to be inheritable, it's better to mark them final. Here's why: you can't predict how someone might use your class. If you allow inherita …
answered Oct 10 '19 by Robert Harvey
0
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You need basically three things: A server machine with a program on it that can receive TCP/IP or UDP requests over WIFI An Android app that can send those requests. Some code that maps the …
answered Jan 30 '14 by Robert Harvey
3
votes
Presumably, you won't have to code exceptions for various devices (i.e. all of the Android devices should behave the same). Accordingly, you should only need one Android device; it should be a relatively popular one. By the time v2.3 of Android is released, maybe the market will be less fragmented. …
answered Nov 16 '10 by Robert Harvey
5
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UI design patterns like Model-View-Controller, Model-View-Presenter and Model-View-ViewModel routinely provide mechanisms (i.e. separate classes) that allow Separation of Concerns between the surface …
answered Nov 26 '16 by Robert Harvey

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