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Results tagged with Search options user 164151

A methodology that enables a system to be modeled as a set of objects that can be controlled and manipulated in a modular manner

2
votes
For what it's worth, this actually has a semi-practical use. In the scenario you have set up, you can only use objects of type A or B via the interface defined by A. The function B::f is only callable …
answered Jan 24 '16 by 5gon12eder
21
votes
Your function should look like this. void replace(struct string * s, int i, char c); This accepts a pointer to the object to operate on as the first parameter. In C++, this is known as the this-poi …
answered May 25 '16 by 5gon12eder
2
votes
I'd only like to point out the following: This use of super super.aBarMethod(); is actually harmful because it disables dynamic dispatch for this call. This means that if a sub-class overrides aB …
answered Apr 3 '15 by 5gon12eder
1
vote
To solve this problem again, I could make the setters final, but this I have never seen. I think that this is the appropriate solution. I regret that you've never seen that before because I thin …
answered Jan 8 '16 by 5gon12eder