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Representational state transfer, or REST, is an architectural style for networking software to transfer information through the web.

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How should I name my endpoint while adhering to the REST naming conventions? REST doesn't care what spelling you use for your resource identifiers. Think about how you would work through … that, when you submit it, resumes the job. At no point in this flow do you, the client, need to figure out how to spell an identifier. You just follow links and fill in forms. That's REST. /a216fc62 …
answered Apr 9 '18 by VoiceOfUnreason
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the variation in standard methods is that we can now use generic components that understand those semantics to do a lot of the work for us. For example, using the standard REST methods the standard … thesis, in particular Chapter 6, where he reviews the "experience and lessons learned from applying REST" to "guide the design and development of the architecture for the modern Web". Jim Webber's talk …
answered Nov 15 '18 by VoiceOfUnreason
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It depends An important thing to recognize is that the status code, as well as the headers, are metadata that has meaning to the generic components that are participating in the message exchange. …
answered Apr 26 '18 by VoiceOfUnreason
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REST doesn't care what spelling you use for the URI; any information encoded into the identifier is done at the server's discretion and for its own exclusive use. Would this be acceptable …
answered Apr 10 '18 by VoiceOfUnreason
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; REST doesn't care what spelling you use for your resource identifiers, or what information you encode into them. …
answered Aug 25 by VoiceOfUnreason
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Oracle: when you aren't sure how to do something with REST, as how you would do it with a web site. what happens when that resource required a considerable amount of metadata? How does the client …
answered Apr 21 '17 by VoiceOfUnreason
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existence of endpoints /json/C and /json/F that do the right thing. What's the analog to this as a pure REST API? Just putting the links back into the representations of the process resources, so that the … "content negotiation" or CQRS or whatever doesn't really matter. The main point of REST is making the endpoints discoverable, which gives you as the service providers the ability to move your endpoints …
answered Dec 2 '16 by VoiceOfUnreason
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REST doesn't care what spelling you use for your identifiers -- they are opaque, from the point of view of the client, so the server can do whatever it likes. There are conventions in play for URI … design to make them more easily understood by human's. See Designing a REST API by URI vs query string. My question really is do I have to follow the full path of url if each policy has a unique …
answered Apr 6 '17 by VoiceOfUnreason
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Is this what is meant by intent? From a data model perspective, transfer objects don't exist, but the REST api exposes them as a representation of what the customer wants to do? That's a pretty … cannot detect implementation changes on your side). That said, there's nothing particularly REST, or even Web, about this. An "intent" message delivered to an API exposed as an RPC endpoint would …
answered Oct 28 '16 by VoiceOfUnreason
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? Slightly the wrong question. REST doesn't care how you do it, beyond the rule that you are using hypermedia controls and media-types. HTTP affords PUT and DELETE as methods. But HTML is a well … question of what URI spellings to use. REST doesn't care. But common URI design guidelines correctly point out that resources are nouns. There are a lot of APIs for manipulating resources in …
answered Feb 5 '16 by VoiceOfUnreason
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XML is supposed to be also possible, but I challenge a real use case... https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4287 https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc5023 Is there a standard governing RESTful service …
answered Oct 29 '16 by VoiceOfUnreason
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REST doesn't care what spelling you use for your resources. In a hypermedia api (which is what REST really means), the clients don't care either; they would simply be following whatever links were … talk REST in the Large. HTTP is the application protocol for a 1950s office, where all work is transacted by politely placing documents in in-trays; and then some side effect of placing that …
answered Oct 8 '18 by VoiceOfUnreason
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If you want to understand REST, or HATEOAS, you should probably start by understanding the web. HAL is (effectively) just a substitute for HTML; if you understand how HTML "works", then … understanding HAL's role is much easier. What is the "Engine of Application State" referring to? Chapter 5 of Fielding's Thesis. REST is defined by four interface constraints: identification of …
answered Dec 30 '18 by VoiceOfUnreason
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What's the best approach to build out this feature? I feel that using the public apis won't scale well, especially because the emails are generated all at once, and it could potentially be a lot of …
answered Aug 4 '16 by VoiceOfUnreason
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the form to the resource identified by form.action. The response would be another html page. Expressed in REST terms, the initial state of the application would be described by a hypermedia … , because I find that thinking about the document helps get past the mental block of confusing the "resource" with the "thing that's actually doing the work". See: REST in Practice by Jim Webber. …
answered Feb 5 '16 by VoiceOfUnreason

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