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Results tagged with Search options user 3223

Questions about software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified.

1
vote
"Open source" is a broad term. Its approach can be more pragmatic ("this is a useful approach for doing development") than philosophical, and it includes people from a variety of perpsectives, so I d …
answered Mar 18 '14 by Josh Kelley
2
votes
Company ownership of software that you develop is a legal matter; see Joel Spolsky's excellent description and analysis for more details. As such, it's really up to a lawyer to figure out wording tha …
answered Jan 17 '14 by Josh Kelley
26
votes
I would recommend any of Google's open source C++ code, such as the following: Google Test Protocol Buffers Chromium Advantages of using Google code: It's written to high standards and is peer r …
answered Nov 12 '12 by Josh Kelley
2
votes
Web analytics are ridiculously easy to implement (the server already collects all of the necessary information on which pages are hit), and there was a lot of financial incentive to develop them (sinc …
answered Jun 12 '13 by Josh Kelley
5
votes
I think you may be fighting a losing battle; I'm not sure how "I want to make my source code available to others to do more or less what they want to" (the definition of open source) is compatible wit …
answered Aug 16 '15 by Josh Kelley
3
votes
Your best bet is to dual license under the GPL (for non-web-based software) or AGPL (for web-based software) and a closed-source license of your choice (which you would grant as you wish with written …
answered Feb 23 '11 by Josh Kelley