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This tag is for questions about the practice of code review and code walkthroughs. For reviews of existing, working code, please see http://codereview.stackexchange.com

7
votes
Aiming for 100% code review of every line of code produced is probably unrealistic. Doing so would require a great deal of developer/tester time, reducing the effort spent on actually producing softwa …
answered Jan 5 '12 by Thomas Owens
2
votes
There's no one-size fits all answer to this question. The amount of effort for a peer review will change depending on the objectives of the review, the complexity of the change, and the level of forma …
answered Oct 6 '15 by Thomas Owens
3
votes
In a perfect world, everything would be explicitly read by the author and peer reviewed by at least one other person, from requirements specs to user manuals to the test cases. But reviews, even simpl …
answered Oct 3 '11 by Thomas Owens
62
votes
Like Simon Whitehead mentions in his comment, it depends on your branching strategy. If the developers have their own private branch for development (which I'd recommend in most situations anyway), I …
answered Sep 7 '12 by Thomas Owens
9
votes
Typically, no. In my experiences, code review happens after any developer-driven testing. The responsible developer would make the changes to the code, update any unit or integration tests, and usuall …
answered Mar 21 '17 by Thomas Owens
45
votes
Everything that you mention is perfectly valid to point out in a code review. When I receive a code review, I do review the tests. If the tests don't provide sufficient coverage, that's something to …
answered Dec 15 '16 by Thomas Owens
14
votes
It seems like the problems begin with planning. When you determine the capacity of the team to take on a given body of work, you should consider the time that it will take to peer review the work done …
answered Apr 23 by Thomas Owens
8
votes
The reason for the small code reviews is to maximize effectiveness. Studies involving the Personal Software Process have found that reviewers are most effective, with respect to maximizing defects id …
answered Jun 19 '12 by Thomas Owens
25
votes
There are other reasons to do a code review. If you have developers who are familiar with similar technologies, it may be useful to hold a code review meeting where you walkthrough the code and use it …
answered Feb 7 '17 by Thomas Owens
8
votes
The Personal Software Process technique for reviews might be useful, although it relies on having historical data about your work and quality of products. You start with historical data about your wo …
answered Mar 12 '12 by Thomas Owens
3
votes
Refactoring for the sake of refactoring, even if it's to better code, just simply isn't worth it, especially in a business context. Like you've pointed out, your code reviews are lengthy and challeng …
answered Dec 13 '18 by Thomas Owens
76
votes
There are multiple reasons why you would want to conduct a code review: Education of other developers. Ensure that everyone sees the modification associated with a defect fix or enhancement so that …
answered Sep 10 '14 by Thomas Owens
2
votes
What happens in a code review doesn't depend on the type of project. The general things you look for are the same in iOS projects as Android projects as the embedded systems code for avionics. However …
answered Jan 20 '12 by Thomas Owens
1
vote
The advantage of a code review is to have another developer (preferably someone else familiar with the goals of the project) look at your work to find things that you missed. Working alone, you don't …
answered Nov 13 '12 by Thomas Owens
3
votes
The idea of a required code review before it ends up in a shared branch is a good idea. Of course, the people who are doing the code review should be the people with the knowledge of the system under …
answered Sep 9 '16 by Thomas Owens

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