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Questions about the objective meaning or common understanding of words and concepts related to the systems development life cycle

13
votes
amount of formality and ceremony. Discussing the terminology difference between a "process model" and a "process methodology" is mostly useful during academic discussions of process models. 1 I'm …
answered Feb 9 '12 by Thomas Owens
20
votes
Is software development engineering? If no, what are the things that it lacks in order to be qualified thus? Yes, software engineering is an engineering discipline. Wikipedia defines engineerin …
answered Oct 16 '08 by Thomas Owens
4
votes
Requirements engineering is a term that includes all activities related to requirements - elicitation, analysis, documentation and specification, validation, and management. It might also involve some …
answered Mar 1 '12 by Thomas Owens
4
votes
You're definitely describing push technology, and it sounds like you're describing what's called "pushlet" on Wikipedia. I've heard of this technique, but I wasn't aware of its name until just now. It …
answered Oct 3 '11 by Thomas Owens
7
votes
The Scrum Master is supposed to be several things: A coach to both the team and the organization. Someone who teaches and guides the team and organization on the implementation of the Scrum framewor …
answered Dec 3 '18 by Thomas Owens
4
votes
In the context of requirements engineering, the concept of a "system requirement" is referring to a level of decomposition. In a sufficiently complex system, you could have any number of components (w …
answered Nov 5 '14 by Thomas Owens
7
votes
From the IEEE Standard Glossary of Software Engineering Terminology, which is cited in the Software Engineering Body of Knowledge KA for Software Testing and Software Quality: bug. See: error …
answered Sep 11 '11 by Thomas Owens
1
vote
If the method is simply returning an attribute of the object, I would call it an accessor, since it is simply used to access a private member variable of the object. If the method performs some kind …
answered Feb 14 '12 by Thomas Owens
20
votes
The first discussions of software engineering began in the mid-1950s, which places it around the same time as the SHARE user group previously mentioned in a now-deleted answer. The widely accepted be …
answered May 23 '12 by Thomas Owens
5
votes
The terms that are defined in Software Security: Building Security In are simply the author's definitions of the terms. There are different definitions of the terms, as pointed out in another question …
answered Oct 27 '13 by Thomas Owens
13
votes
The term "out of scope requirement" can possibly be used. This means that the requirement has been captured within your process and is trackable, but it has been determined that the requirement is som …
answered Mar 25 '12 by Thomas Owens
0
votes
code is not actually executed during the review. However, in common terminology, "static analysis" typically refers to machine parsing of source or object files while "review" indicates that humans are the one doing the analysis. …
answered Mar 26 '12 by Thomas Owens
20
votes
The three points are separate: Class names should be nouns or noun phrases. This means that the name of the class should be something that would be the subject of a verb. In the case of object-orien …
answered May 9 '13 by Thomas Owens
3
votes
If you're looking for formal terminology, I'd forget the term "bug" all together. Only consider mistake, error, fault, and failure. Based on IEEE610.12-90, the definitions are (as provided in the …
answered Aug 31 '12 by Thomas Owens
8
votes
Cloud computing says absolutely nothing about who owns the resources. Cloud computing is an architecture for developing distributed, network-based applications. There are a number of cloud computing s …
answered Nov 10 '11 by Thomas Owens

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