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HyperText Transfer Protocol - a textual system for representing web requests and replies.

0
votes
First, RFC 2616 is obsolete; you should be referring to RFC 7230 and RFC 7231 instead. (RFC 7230 § 5.5) HTTP servers which receive the absolute form of a URI in the request-line ignore the Host … : header and use only that absolute URI for any further processing. The server then has to decide what to do with it. Existing general purpose HTTP servers use virtual hosts to provide service for several …
answered Sep 24 '15 by Michael Hampton
3
votes
http://www.msftncsi.com/ncsi.txt (and http://ipv6.msftncsi.com/ncsi.txt to check IPv6 connectivity) and check that the response body contains the string "Microsoft NCSI". If it does not, then …
answered Dec 26 '13 by Michael Hampton
31
votes
, etc. HTTP status codes have their own IANA registry, each one traceable back to the RFC (or in one case, I-D) that defined it. In the particular case of Twitter's strange 420 status code versus the …
answered Nov 11 '13 by Michael Hampton
7
votes
The situation you are trying to avoid here is that of API users sending their credentials over the wire in a form easily sniffed by third parties. If you either redirect to HTTPS or serve any HTTP … error, you don't avoid this situation; the credentials are already sent before you have a chance to respond. The only really proper thing to do is to not serve the API on HTTP at all, not even for …
answered Oct 27 '15 by Michael Hampton