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Questions about software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified.

3
votes
I contributed an extension to a Squirrelmail plugin, because I wanted to use that functionality and it was not already available.
answered Oct 12 '10 by Bart van Ingen Schenau
5
votes
You can distribute the code under the Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works (by-nd) license, but it will generally not be considered to be open source due to the restriction on derived proj …
answered May 18 '13 by Bart van Ingen Schenau
5
votes
To release a project under an open-source license, you should take these steps: Select an open source license that has acceptable terms for your organisation. You can find a list of open source lice …
answered Nov 6 '13 by Bart van Ingen Schenau
3
votes
Copyright licenses specify if and under which conditions you can make modifications to something that is created by someone else and if and under what conditions you can distribute the original or mod …
answered Feb 3 '15 by Bart van Ingen Schenau
5
votes
The main question here is: Are you copying the code, or are you copying the underlying algorithm. Porting code to a different (programming) language is a gray area in copyright law and it will depend …
answered Feb 5 '14 by Bart van Ingen Schenau
1
vote
If you have files with incompatible licenses in your project, then it is a license violation. This means that you do not have the right to distribute the project in that state. The responsible action …
answered Sep 18 '14 by Bart van Ingen Schenau
5
votes
All code is protected by copyright in one form or the other (unless it has been placed explicitly in the public domain). If you do not attach an explicit copyright license, the default copyright licen …
answered Nov 12 '14 by Bart van Ingen Schenau
1
vote
Yes, that is what it means. However, it is recommended that you already include that second file with a copy of the license, just to avoid that a (potential) user of your software needs to go to a di …
answered Jan 17 '16 by Bart van Ingen Schenau
4
votes
For a definitive answer, you will need to consult a lawyer. The fact that your code is not a literal copy is a good start. The two remaining questions are Are the differences of such a nature that …
answered Jun 6 '13 by Bart van Ingen Schenau
3
votes
Can I make the source available only to those who bought the software? Yes. There are no (open-source) licenses that require you to provide the source code to just anybody. The most that is requi …
answered Aug 19 '15 by Bart van Ingen Schenau
0
votes
To get the easy stuff out of the way, the best way to protect your application's name and logos is by registering those as trademarks. This is irrespective of the licence you use for the source code. …
answered Jun 25 '13 by Bart van Ingen Schenau
4
votes
Making assumptions with legal matters, like copyright licenses, is never a good idea. Wrong assumptions is what lawyers can get big fees on. The fact that there is no explicit copyright license menti …
answered Mar 22 '14 by Bart van Ingen Schenau
5
votes
From a copyright standpoint, a program that is statically linked to a library is a derived work of that library. The reasoning to reach that conclusion is as follows: The (binary) code of the librar …
answered Mar 25 '14 by Bart van Ingen Schenau
4
votes
Somehow, the number of software projects is way bigger than the number of names people can come op with for those projects, especially if you want descriptive, pronounceable names. That makes that it …
answered May 4 '14 by Bart van Ingen Schenau
5
votes
The GPL license is written in such a way that you are not allowed to use GPL-licensed code in a product unless the users of the product have the same rights that are granted by applying the GPL licens …
answered Jun 29 '16 by Bart van Ingen Schenau

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