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Results tagged with Search options user 63202

A methodology that enables a system to be modeled as a set of objects that can be controlled and manipulated in a modular manner

2
votes
A class is a mechanism for creating abstraction. An abstraction is a bundling of capabilities (methods & state) offering the consuming client (a programmer, often ourselves) something useful in a s …
answered Jan 5 '18 by Erik Eidt
0
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So it seems to me that OOP and procedural programming are only different in the way you call a function of an object, but the way you think about a problem and implement its solution is almost the …
answered Mar 10 '18 by Erik Eidt
-2
votes
So, my question would be: how do you guys, know/decide when to use OOP in an application? Always use it. Once you're used to using it, you'll use it for everything. It is a great way to ensure …
answered Jul 26 '16 by Erik Eidt
6
votes
Stop worrying about efficiency and start concerning yourself with creating a good abstraction that is applicable to the domain and complete to the client/user/caller's needs. To do this, we first ide …
answered Jul 18 '16 by Erik Eidt
2
votes
Company has an address too. So in class Address I would have both relations to Person and Company. Addresses should not refer to a Company or Person (but rather vice versa: a Company or Person ha …
answered Jun 2 by Erik Eidt
2
votes
To add to @RobertHarvey's good answer and @tofro's excellent observation in comment: If the Stable is destroyed, so the horses too. This snippet is unrealistic in a number of ways: Only because …
answered Sep 27 '16 by Erik Eidt
0
votes
A user doesn't need to know the complexity of how it makes the coffee, just that they need to insert a coffee pods and press a button. You've already hit the nail on the head.  Abstraction is abo …
answered Jan 10 by Erik Eidt
4
votes
Then you might consider a base class Shape or interface IShape where the Intersection method is declared. You can override it so that each shape can implement its own version. However, eventually, …
answered Feb 24 '18 by Erik Eidt
1
vote
To expand on what some others are is saying, consider the object's lifetime. Now consider the object's member's lifetimes. If these are not the same or very similar, then some members that have (sub …
answered Aug 9 '16 by Erik Eidt
5
votes
The C# struct concept, as you are seeing elsewhere, is a value notion. Thus, a field of type struct is a value, not a reference. A field of type struct is an embedded value. This doesn't map par …
answered Dec 22 '17 by Erik Eidt
2
votes
There is nothing wrong with writing pure functions as statics in object oriented programming. Given your example, it does not appear necessary to make instance fields out of the intermediate results. …
answered Aug 19 '15 by Erik Eidt
1
vote
I agree with @FrankHileman's comment on terminology of messages as having state as being confusing and a rather non-standard usage of the concept of messages. Messages, almost by definition, are immu …
answered Aug 10 '17 by Erik Eidt
6
votes
It isn't duplication of data in the sense of denormalization; all it is, is an extra accessor method. Duplication of data in the sense of denormalization or caching (another way to describe denorma …
answered May 15 '16 by Erik Eidt
2
votes
I'm not sure there is any one answer, but rather many (likely opinionated) answers. What you're talking about might generally fall under Software Development Process or Design Methodologies, such as …
answered Apr 22 '16 by Erik Eidt
0
votes
What you need is a variety of instances. You don't need that same variety in classes, neither the 20, nor even the 4 intermediate subclasses. We should not create (new, sub-) classes when instances o …
answered Nov 29 '16 by Erik Eidt

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