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Questions about the GNU General Public License

1
vote
Copyright law questions are by definition off topic, and the answers you can get here are by definition untrustworthy. However, you are basically right: the purpose of copyright is to restrict redist …
answered Jun 24 '13 by Kilian Foth
4
votes
the default legal situation would be. It is often easier and more reliable to pick the later, GPL'd version and abide by the GPL, for which there is ample precedence and advice available, than to use code for which you technically have no rights whatsoever. …
answered Mar 3 '16 by Kilian Foth
10
votes
That's not what that clause is about. Is there some way that I can GPL the output people get from use of my program? For example, if my program is used to develop hardware designs, can I require … copied (more or less) from text in your program. For instance, part of the output of Bison (see above) would be covered by the GNU GPL, if we had not made an exception in this specific case. As the …
answered Feb 25 '16 by Kilian Foth
5
votes
The GPL is quite clear that its concern is with the distribution of the sources of a system in the preferred form of the work for making changes in it. Nobody develops a neural network by editing …
answered Jun 14 '18 by Kilian Foth
22
votes
The GPL, in all its variants, is a redistribution license. It simply doesn't apply at all if you don't redistribute code. It may apply in the future if, some day, you decide to make a product out of your application, but not now. …
answered Jul 25 '11 by Kilian Foth
1
vote
published your code before GPL 3 existed, it's obvious that you didn't mean this version. If you keep publishing it until after the point where version 3 was introduced, this will almost certainly be taken …
answered Oct 24 '17 by Kilian Foth
3
votes
We cannot possibly answer this. The crucial question is "Is your code a derived work of their code?" Since you started out with their code, it might very well be, even if no line remained unchanged. …
answered May 12 '16 by Kilian Foth