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Results tagged with Search options user 855

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3
votes
Not sure where you draw the line on looking at copies of code or a question about how you solved a particular problem. How much detail can you go into without revealing something important about the c …
answered Feb 8 '12 by JeffO
0
votes
I hope I wouldn't have to write a connections string to a DB 4 file, but some basic coding should be expected shouldn't it? I'd ask an accountant or financial analyst how to write an if statement in a …
answered Jan 26 '11 by JeffO
1
vote
I'd say if you're passionate about programming, you'll be able to spot others. All you have to do is talk about programming which shouldn't be difficult during an interview. And focus on the …
answered Jul 25 '11 by JeffO
2
votes
If there are any formations of teams on projects, those members should have an interest in getting qualified people to fill a vacant position. You may want to start some sort of mentorship program w …
answered Dec 12 '11 by JeffO
0
votes
I think zappos.com has shown that a job doesn't have to be crappy when you work for a good company. The worst part of being in support is not being able to help someone. If you screwed users over with …
answered Oct 14 '10 by JeffO
2
votes
include this work. This is no different than a portfolio for a writer, musician or other type of creative work. You can write code during the interview process, but there can be drawbacks because of …
answered Sep 19 '13 by JeffO
0
votes
Ask for some evidence. The only thing I can think of is if someone found out you hired a candidate with a lower score they would have a better case for discrimination.
answered Jan 6 '11 by JeffO
2
votes
Consider a set of more direct questions after you've been made an offer. No need to be rude, but if you have any concerns...
answered Nov 4 '10 by JeffO
1
vote
At some point, they should have at least addressed the positive if they want to encourage you to join the team. Any quality manager/team leader should be asking him/herself this question on a daily ba …
answered Jan 30 '12 by JeffO
1
vote
Let them know that working on your own wasn't just by choice and that you are interested in working within a team. Be upfront about what you see as the good and the bad. I think he biggest concern is …
answered Jan 11 '12 by JeffO
3
votes
I don't think the particular style matters in an interview code question, but it is good to see that you have one and are aware of why you do things the way you do it. Based on your question, it …
answered Oct 3 '11 by JeffO
2
votes
In a perfect world, only if it relates to programming like SO posts. For non-programming behaviors, you have to decide if it will impact their job performance. Someone who likes to party is not neces …
answered Nov 16 '10 by JeffO
4
votes
I'd want both, but they may display a "code that just works" in one solution and then possibly discuss potential solutions for improvement in that one or another problem. If you ask someone to write …
answered Mar 16 '13 by JeffO
3
votes
Would you feel better about this company if they didn't ask you to review theirs or any other side, solve a coding problem, or mock up some sort of design? They could use any of this as free advice. O …
answered Aug 15 '11 by JeffO
6
votes
If you want to see if a programmer can debug, give them code to fix. It's the same approach if you want to see if they can write code. Give them a problem and have them write code. Now, I'm confused …
answered Mar 1 '12 by JeffO

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