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Results tagged with Search options user 855

Many software projects are too large for a single developer to complete in a reasonable amount of time. The team leader is a developer who guides the programmers into getting the job done.

1
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If you see these people as both a software developer and a sales developer, you should give them the opportunity to make a good salary and have equity in your company. Going on their own is a risk tha …
answered Aug 24 '11 by JeffO
4
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I think you need to get creative. Start asking around for some side project requests that your seniors have been putting off. By working on something independently (or better yet, get another junior d …
answered Feb 7 '13 by JeffO
2
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At some point you have to be in charge. You sound like you're making an effort to let them voice their opinions. Your suggestions may not be perfect. The other devs may not understand/agree with you. …
answered Jan 19 '12 by JeffO
1
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You've been with them for a year and you have no idea what they think? Start gathering all of the little comments, concerns, good and bad situations you've picked up on in the last year and offer your …
answered May 25 '11 by JeffO
2
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It depends on the make-up of the team and the individual leader. An inexperienced team will need a leader with higher technical skills along with the ability, interpersonal skills, and respect to pr …
answered Feb 28 '12 by JeffO
1
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You need to ask the person paying the salaries what your expectations of the consultant's time should be and what to do if you are not satisfied with the quality of the work. Once that is established, …
answered Aug 1 '11 by JeffO
2
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I'd be concerned with someone refusing a common request who doesn't feel the need to provide an explanation. Hopefully they phrased it as a preference and not a refusal. No indication that this is a t …
answered Feb 26 '13 by JeffO
2
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Your teammates need to give yourselves the credit for the success. Make sure you are in the guidelines of your organization about job responsibilities and following the letter of the law. Managers may …
answered Aug 5 '11 by JeffO
2
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Who's the boss? Where does it end? You don't have to share information. You don't have to provide documentation. Continuously fail to get things done on time. Don't follow coding standards. Either som …
answered May 3 '11 by JeffO
1
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Just because in the scrum process you may not always take "the lead" you still have hiring, budget and other manager duties. You going to have a sprint to see if you're going to fire somone?
answered Nov 9 '11 by JeffO
17
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Someone needs to be the manager, but in your team's case, I don't think this is a full-time position. Hire another sr. dev and make one of them the manager. Ideally, the one who best fits being a mana …
answered Jun 2 '12 by JeffO
5
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It will be tough to be the best programmer you are capable of and be a leader, so accept the fact that you may be spending time doing things you don't like to do when you'd rather be coding. Not that …
answered Dec 3 '10 by JeffO
2
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Although you are trying to manage a team and want to keep everyone motivated (having a sense of fairness helps), but are you sacrificing the project by not having your best programmer programming? I m …
answered Jun 11 '12 by JeffO