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Macros are used to make a sequence of computing instructions available to the programmer as a single program statement, making the programming task less tedious and less error-prone.[

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Most Probably Not. Lisp Macros appear to have two big purposes. First is the DRY ("don't-repeat-yourself") aspect, enabling the capture of patterns that would otherwise be difficult-or-impossible … in the language. Second is a performance advantage that comes from being able to apply arbitrary computation at compile-time. A good number of cases where Lisp programmers appear to require macros
answered Apr 20 '16 by HostileFork