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15

Since you write that you're a .NET developer and you don't even mention F#, odds are that you're a C# developer. In that case, I'd strongly suggest that you learn F# first. It's another .NET language, and it's a great stepping stone for anyone coming from C#. In itself, it's a great FP language, but it also offers full interoperability with the existing ....


8

I have never personally met anyone who working with functional programming language in their day today job. I am paid to write OCaml, AMA! My main reservations are on whether Haskell is a good language to start with and whether it is actually used anywhere in the industry. Haskell isn't a great language for your first language, but it is a very solid ...


3

Api.EmployeeController.Update(Api.EmployeeUpdateDto) => Services.EmployeeService.Update(Service.EmployeeUpdateDto) => Data.EmployeeRepository.Update(Entities.Employee) => Data.EfDbContext.Employees.Update(Entities.Employee Let's look at it this way: what if you were to tell your business counterpart this? Just the above word-for-word. I would wager he/she ...


2

I could also suggest you to look at Scala, which, on its front page, literally says: "Scala combines object-oriented and functional programming in one concise, high-level language." Arguably, if you come from an OO background, like most of us, I'd dare say, then using Scala makes sense, if anything for the sake of experimentation. Also, the main reason is ...


2

You can use same .Net standard dll in the projects of type .Net Core and .Net Framework. .NET Standard is the best way to add cross-platform support to a .NET library. .NET Standard is a specification of .NET APIs that are available on all .NET implementations. Targeting .NET Standard lets you produce libraries that are constrained to use APIs that are in a ...


2

Ultimately, it depends on your requirements, specificially how often and for what reasons do you expect the application to lose the ability to reconnect? is it reasonable to assume a reconnect will be possible some minutes later? how much data can get lost in case there is unsaved data, and how important could that data be? Depending on the answers to ...


2

May i suggest using gRPC. It's relatively easy to build services with it and you get a lot of benefits: you have a strong api contract and strong api governance as the api spec is put apart from the code you can generate client/server code in many languages it's well supported with current asp .net core technology One word of caution, think twice before ...


1

By defition the dependency injection is a pattern. The ASP.NET Core is built around dependency injection as it allows great flexibility in the framework. In a plain .NET Core application, the DI pattern can be used and also overused. As with any technology and patterns, in may be used inapropriately. This depends on your application and must be evaulated ...


1

You can mix and match, but you may get a lit of runtime DLLs added to older .net projects. See here for examples https://www.hanselman.com/blog/ReferencingNETStandardAssembliesFromBothNETCoreAndNETFramework.aspx https://weblog.west-wind.com/posts/2019/Feb/19/Using-NET-Standard-with-Full-Framework-NET


1

If your main interest is in broadening your programming mind and skill set, more academic languages like Haskell, ML or Clean are probably for you. Haskell is actually used in industry, but not on a very broad range (e.g. Facebook has a group doing Haskell, Standard Chartered maintains an own Haskell dialect, etc.). If you are more interested in practical ...


1

Your code is contradictory. Here, you state that the content of your ITypeAData object is intended as a read-only value: public interface ITypeAData { int Value { get; } } Here, you clearly intend to be able to set the value of your ITypeAData content: (dataManager.TypeAData as TypeAData).Value = 0; This is contradictory. Either it's intended to ...


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