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6

Since you are CPU-limited, you need to get your hands on 150 CPU cores, one for each thread. This rules out a single server, since a server of such proportions would be prohibitively expensive – and you don't really need it. Your general architecture with a common frontend that distributes work to multiple workers and combines their results appears to be ...


6

I'm using EC2 more traditionally, as servers. The problems I'd foresee with what you're attempting: storage: You have two choices, persistent EBS and ephemeral storage. EBS is quite slow, can't really imagine working with an IDE using such a slow disk. Ephemeral storage goes away as soon as you stop your instance, so not quite good option either. And of ...


4

Firstly, the things you're currently investigating would largely be the same regardless of whether you're taking your site from one machine to several (in-site) servers, to Azure, to Rackspace, etc. When it comes to session state, your production site is now likely to run across several instances so will need to persist session data at a shared store so ...


3

"We are considering creating a queue for each microservice and publishing the messages to the queues via SNS." Yes, then your queues can subscribe to the notification and you no longer need the message service. Essentially its fan out routing. Your microservices become queue workers However, lots of queues and notifications can become complicated. SQS + ...


2

First, you need to open an inbound port(mentioned here) for postgresql on your EC2 instance. I am not an expert of postgresql but it should be 5432 if you are using defaults. You may follow help.ubuntu's documentation to configure postgre, especially you need to make postgre listen to network in order to accept connections from internet via changing the ...


2

I would design my interface and task master under two assumptions: Processing power is distributed I don't always have enough processing power available If the jobs are inherently long, and the client/end-user knows this, my preference is to make the task master respectful of "competing" tasks. I'll favor progress notifications and mechanisms for client-...


2

I believe there is a 6Mb limit on the request/response, which would make it unsuitable. https://docs.aws.amazon.com/lambda/latest/dg/limits.html Ideally you want a resumable stream of data for large stuff.


1

I don't know the details for Android, but iOS will most definitely not allow you to directly access the fingerprint data, let alone upload it. By handling all biometric encryption/decryption in a separate processor (the 'Security Enclave'), that data is basically locked down to the physical device. To quote Apple Developer Documentation: To maximize ...


1

Based on the tools mentioned in your post, one potential way to solve this is through the use of Lambda function. It might be overkill for your situation but you could have a function determine the required I.P Addresses and then maintain the Security Group based on that, you could add auditing and alerting as required.


1

You have 2 options. If you also want to shutdown and start cluster then option 1, the AWS Data Pipeline is better: 1. AWS Data Pipeline DeveloperGuide: what-is-datapipeline 2. Oozie Workflow You could use Oozie. Here is an example how to automate Spark jobs in AWS with Oozie: https://aws.amazon.com/de/blogs/big-data/use-apache-oozie-workflows-to-...


1

When I create a skill does it reside on the Echo itself or does the echo have to go out to the internet and retrieve it? The code driving the skill is hosted either as a Lambda function (in which case it resides in AWS' infrastructure), or as a REST endpoint hosted on your own infrastructure. ...is there any way I can develop a skill and store it locally ...


1

There is quite a lot of possible solutions to your problem. You can easily write scripts to automate the steps of the process or use an existing ready-to-use continuous integration solution. I will shortly describe the first solution, where you write scripts to do this yourself. On the server where your webapp mywebapp is deployed, write a small script ...


1

I think what you need is a Continuous Integration (CI) server. You can host your own, for example Jenkins which has BitBucket integration or use a hosted service like CodeShip which has a free plan. You could try and set up your own set of scripts to do a similar job but the industry has already provided a solution in this area. You didn't mention tests ...


1

Perhaps SQS (Amazon Simple Queue Service) could help you. The principle idea is that the frontend would publish a message on the queue and promptly forget about it. The backend service, upon waking up would consume messages from the queue until there is no more work to do, and then go to sleep. There are good apis for many languages, and it is generally ...


1

In my experience, Amazon doesn't seem to expect Micro instances to be used for much of anything other than trying out AWS or hosting an app while still in development. For a database you'll actually be using, you should at least get a Small instance, in my opinion. That said, if I were you I'd use RDS. It's Amazon's relational database, and it frees you ...


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