11

Put together a stock "thank you for your interest" letter that covers the possibilities of a) features you will NEVER implement even if I show up on your doorstep with a bag of gold, b) features you don't PLAN to implement but maybe, and c) features you'd like to implement but can't right now. Send that. Because you ALMOST never know when you might find ...


9

Don't be fooled by the "grass is greener" syndrome. You have something that is getting complete, it works, and will be available on other platforms in the future like you want... so why would you want to change now!? You know the situation you currently have, if you changed you'd have to discover the problems you'll face all over again - its one reason why ...


8

Ideally, you should use such requests as an opportunity to help you and users better understand the application. If you think of it, the very reasons why you prefer to ignore these requests are quite important information and you'd rather have them stored and documented than buried and forgotten deep down in your mind. If a request is ignored because you ...


7

Yes, there are bots that auto down applications in order to boost rankings of applications: View Article Here Your downloads were most likely used as a way to mask the fact they are downloading specific apps to boost rankings. So 20 bots download Angry Birds (for example), 2 of those also download yours and some others to make it look like normal usage. ...


7

There is no official story from Oracle as to why they closed the store. From the Distimo Blog article "Java App Store discontinued by Sun/Oracle?": We have been unable to uncover any official announcement on the matter. All that is left is speculation (1, 2); perhaps Oracle didn't want to deal with the malware potential and PR nightmare, perhaps ...


7

To me, the table on the website you mentioned has a somewhat-naïve representation of these differences. It seems to focus on pushing a native app as the best possible solution because of "browsing speed" and access to device functionality, but this may not always be what you actually want to achieve. They haven't taken into consideration other factors which ...


6

Apple has this scenario covered. Your client will need to join the iOS dev program so they can post things to the store. They can then add you to their program for development certificates and such if you don't have your own as well as provision an iTunes connect account for you to publish to the store on their behalf. I would advise getting your own iOS ...


6

Don't know what you app is, but have you considered/would a data driven model work for you - the app would not need to change and the data can be downloaded of servers you provide and manage. Maybe a (yet another) DSL would be of use. Another alternate is how locked into Apple are you? Build you business on Android - then you have the choice to use a store/...


6

Three words: cross-platform compatibility. If you write your game in HTML and Javascript, it will run on any platform where there is a web browser on the device (which is most devices nowadays). If you write it in Java, it will run anywhere there is a Java runtime installed. If you write your game to target specific platforms, you will have to write it ...


5

Yes. You can advertise in Windows Store, but you need to handle payment, deployment and installation yourself.


5

There is nothing in the certification process (so far) that prevents this scenario. As long as your application will run without crashing and doesn't violate any of the technical specifications of the platform (e.g. calling unexposed APIs), you'll pass.


5

If one builds an app with 64-bit support using current versions of Xcode, it is no longer compatible with iOS devices running iOS 5.0 or earlier. Perhaps a developer wants to separately support customers who have already downloaded/purchased the app on those old devices by maintaining the old app's complete toolchain, unmodified by any new commits or tools (...


4

Apple effectively ban any GPL because they only allow redistribution through the store and by registered developers. So if you distribute the GPL to your users they cannot abide by it. Apple could simply allow any GPL app to be redistributed by any user through a free section of the site - but chose not to. Ironically OSX is based on a free BSD Unix kernel. ...


4

The iPad Volume Purchasing Program (VPP) is now available in Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, New Zealand, Spain, UK along with the USA. See https://developer.apple.com/news/?id=09042012a and other news sites for more information. If that is not available, you can use the iOS Enterprise Distribution mechanism. Basically, an organization ...


4

I don't think rewriting from scratch is a good idea in general, but to address a couple of the technical points you mentioned: I want to release mobile versions of this application too, and with C# a lot of the backend code could be reused on all platforms. There's not really any particular reason why you couldn't reuse your C++ code for mobile platforms....


4

Apple is not gonna ban an application if the application was developed outside of Xcode, however apple is gonna ban an app that doesn't follow the guidelines so if the tool you are using to develop applications creates code that comply with the apple guidelines you are pretty much safe. https://developer.apple.com/appstore/guidelines.html Check them if ...


3

I accidentally discovered a way, sort of... I recently updated one of my apps to use the new iOS 6 mapping features (it's a transit routing app) and the review was completed from submission to App Store in just over 24 hours. On the other hand, another unrelated app update has been waiting for a week with no action. It makes sense that Apple would ...


3

An app will not be rejected only because it has a fixed window size. Although such a design choice could result in an inferior useabity. And that could be a reason for refusal.


3

I don't have any links but I seem to recall Oracle were alarmed while observing the press regarding the android store and malware and didn't want to invest in apple style scrutiny.


3

Probably not. See the iOS App Store Review Guidelines: 2.12 Apps that are not very useful, are simply web sites bundled as apps, or do not provide any lasting entertainment value may be rejected One might guess that if your app is just a pointer to a web site, not even the web site bundled into an app, then it's even less useful than the sort of thing ...


3

Would Apple prioritize apps that they earn money on? There is no short way. Some advises that you may pick up here might not work as well, because there is no guaranteed solution. However, if you contact App Store for recommendation and ask openly your problem, you would definitely get the best answer or guidelines to follow. Thus, cutting corners when ...


3

No, this is not true. Apple will not ban Apps for compiling in Xamarin. This is a myth that might have been spurred by Apple's history to revoke HTML5 Apps when the store first opened. Since then Apple is now accepting those types of Apps, and has been for a long time. Keep in mind that Facebook (one of the stores most popular apps) was once written in ...


3

There was wording in the Developers Agreement for a while to the effect that Apple has the right to reject any code not developed using XCode...but that was targeted specifically at Flash. Xamarin code compiles to native iOS binaries where as Adobe's solution with flash used an interpreter which was slow. That was the meat of the problem.


3

Given that there are some many thousands (maybe millions) of mobile applications for everything including store locators for every StarBucks coffee house ... the recommendation is to move away from specific mobile applications. That is, the best-practice I have seen for efficiency and use is to have web-applications versus downloadable mobile/PC installs. ...


3

The simple answer is that in most cases and within reasonable limits yes, it's ok. Some provisos. Copyright law gives you two basic mechanisms, which depend somewhat on the country. In many cases the use small pieces of code copied from a large work is permitted as "fair use" or "fair dealing". The limits are not well defined, but the principle is solid. ...


3

Putting an app on a public store shows that app to the public. This gives you a whole load of marketing problems about how it should be displayed, what licence should be used etc. Also even if the app is non functional for other users it may reveal some comerically significant information through the UI design for example. I would go with a side loading ...


3

In ye olden times yes, you would write the game logic twice. But in the modern era there is no need to write the game logic twice as instead you would target your game logic against a third party game engine such as Unity or Unreal Engine which has already been ported to your favorite mobile platform. In that way you hire people with your preferred game ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible