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0

As mentioned by @Adriano in the comment, it makes sense when the two services were on different endpoints, and you'll of course find a lot of such designs. But for only one request, I think it's based on your business. let's say two functions are required in one or two calls, know who the user is know what can the user do If you have scenarios in which ...


3

The backend person might have omitted their valid justifications Back-end person claims that front-end should to have two calls. First to authenticate user (login process) with JWT response only then second to authorize to retrieve user permissions, role(s) and user data. At face value, there's little reason to split a single workload into two network ...


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The main focus of Domain Driven Design is to put the business first. The rest of the application (database, rest, input-output) has to depend on business. It would be good if you design this based on your business. So you could ask the business people which statement (1 or 2) sounds more natural to them. I would put the question to the UX expert as well. ...


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Having the application client be responsible for calling commands in the correct order is going down a slippery path. Simple changes, like adding a new field, can have ripple effects throughout the system. So breaking up the authorization process by fields (Solution 3) is a no go. Solution 2 has the side effect that it can grow very complex over time ...


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