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4

The wording of a "function returning type" just means a function defined as returning some type T, such as T f() { .... }. The quoted clause just tells you that using the designator of the function, for example its name f, in an expression, would have the type "pointer to a function returning T". To be read with the following ...


3

Neither double nor long double are suitable for expressing fractional numbers. They are for floating point numbers, not fractional numbers. You should use a fractional number data type, something like this: struct fraction { intmax_t numerator; uintmax_t denominator; }; Instead of intmax_t / uintmax_t, you should probably use an arbitrary sized ...


3

I think the main misconception expressed in this question here is that there is a difference between a "word of bits" (or bitset) and "integers" in C. In short: there is not. Specifically in languages which support operator overloading like C++, it would be possible to implement something like a Bitset type. This could represent an array ...


2

There are functions returning void, functions returning int, functions returning double, and so on. To speak about all those functions, you call them “functions returning type”.


1

I've actually upvoted this question, as a perfectly legitimate question from someone attempting to learn. The first thing to say is that it's conventional to distinguish between either "bitwise operators", or "logical operators". A "bitwise logical operator" sounds like a conflation according to this conventional distinction, ...


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