32

Lisp, Smalltalk. Coincidentally, those are also the best languages in the whole bunch. Both Lisp and Smalltalk are languages which are built around strong unifying metaphor. Lisp's metaphor is "everything is a list; this list represents both data and code (as functions)". Smalltalk's metaphor is "everything is an object; the only way to invoke a behaviour ...


11

Yes. You can use BSD-licensed projects in closed-source, commercial projects. You must include the original copyright and license. From WikiPedia's BSD License page: The BSD License allows proprietary use and allows the software released under the license to be incorporated into proprietary products. Works based on the material may be released under a ...


8

Short answer: Ideas, yes. Source code, no. The source code is protected by copyright and the license only allows you to use the source code if you license the result as GPL. This doesn't block you from selling the result, but requires you to provide the source code to anyone you have sold the application to (and stops you from barring them passing the ...


7

For the regular GPL, the answer is no. Quoth the FSF FAQ: Q: Is there some way that I can GPL the output people get from use of my program? For example, if my program is used to develop hardware designs, can I require that these designs must be free? A: In general this is legally impossible; copyright law does not give you any say in the use of ...


7

TL;DR Use an app store. They do all the hard stuff for you. All you'll need is a simple website to point to your app in the store. You have many questions here, and may issues to resolve... Do I have to produce individual terms of agreement for this program? You don't have to do anything. To be honest, a $1 sudoku solver will not make much of splash in ...


6

Others have already said Lisp so I must bring up Forth. It is very easy to implement and the rules of the language are simple to follow. It is a stack-based language with a dictionary of "words." You can easily extend the language using some inherit features. A VERY terse example of turtle graphics: \ 8.8 fixed point sine table lookup -2 var n F9F2 , ...


6

C and Fortran are languages that spring to mind. They are very stable and their syntax is easily contained in one's mind. Other than writing bad code yourself, there are very few suprises when using these languages. But I wouldn't hold them up as great languages for rapid application development. I prefer the rapid advancement of languages with features ...


6

TeX, the typesetting system, has been very stable since version 3. Since version 3, TeX has used an idiosyncratic version numbering system, where updates have been indicated by adding an extra digit at the end of the decimal, so that the version number asymptotically approaches π. This is a reflection of the fact that TeX is now very stable, and only ...


6

This situation is covered in the GNU GPL FAQ, in the section "I'd like to incorporate GPL-covered software in my proprietary system. Can I do this?" in many cases you can distribute the GPL-covered software alongside your proprietary system. To do this validly, you must make sure that the free and non-free programs communicate at arms length, that ...


5

It is done the same way it is done on any OS; by distributing packaged binaries. configure; make; make install is still commonly seen in instructions for open source software because it is very portable and often allows you to install software written for generic UNIX rather than Linux specifically. Compiling the software on the destination machine (or one ...


5

Bandwidth is cheap. Time is not. I would suggest that if you are selling your software that you have the process as automated as possible, asking as few questions as possible, and have it "just work". Given this, 20mb isn't a lot and you're really looking at 20 seconds or less for most broadband connections. at least in my country. Bundling the software ...


5

I think Code Signing Certificate is an ideal option to protect your application. Code Signing Certificates help create a sense of online confidence when users download your software by verifying the authenticity of your identity. Without code signing user will see - With Code Signing Certificate You can buy a code signing certificate at cheap cost from ...


5

The GPL is a heavily viral license. If you use GPL code in your program at all, the entire codebase has to be compatible with the GPL. If the library in question is available as both GPL and LGPL, you can link to it dynamically (as an external DLL/SO/dylib/whatever) without being in violation of the LGPL. If not, you need to look for another library, or a ...


5

The license is intended to protect your copyright and interests, not to take them away. As the only author of the library, you are free to relicense it under whichever scheme you wish, including for usage in commercial products. Indeed, it's not that uncommon. For instance, PolarSSL is released under GPLv2, but a license can be bought for usage in closed ...


5

In this case, the difficult legal test is deciding whether your data-consuming application can legally be considered "combined with" your AGPL data-producing application. The FSF proposes that two programs must communicate "at arms length" to be considered separate works. (The tricky bit about this rule is that no one is entirely sure how ...


5

For example, if I wrote an open source Android game under the MIT license and some studio decides to put the game on the Play Store, without modification or my permission, and manage to sell thousands of copies, could I challenge them in court via some clause in the license I used or copyright law in general, and win? No, you could not. By licensing it to ...


4

Although Lisp was mentioned, The most minimalistic language I know is scheme. I had a hard time understanding it in university courses where I had to. But it changed my way of thinking about programming, and It is very minimal. As minimal as its whole syntax are Parentheses () and spaces. The only change in the language was the decision to convert the ...


4

I would not expect this to harm your startup but I also would not expect you to gain much benefit from the scenario you describe. Let's start by considering some of the possible risks (and why I don't worry about them). Your published code becomes a part of the product you are marketing. If this work is of poor quality that may do more harm than good. On ...


4

IANAL, but as far as I understand you should ask the contributer to assign the copyrights of the changes to you, refusing to merge if they doesn't. Once the copyrights are you, you can distribute in whatever license you want.


4

It has probably never been easier to sell this kind of software, due to the emergence of online app stores for Mobile phones and now Windows. If you compile your app as a windows store app, sign up for a windows store account, fill in various tax forms, get a PEGI certificate and set up a bank account for them to pay money into. You can upload your app to ...


4

In 2015 there is no need in making such system by yourselves. Every major platform has its own application market. Desktop: On Windows: Microsoft Store On OS X: Mac App Store On Ubuntu: Ubuntu Software Centre Mobile: On iOS: App Store On Android: Google Play On Windows Phone: Microsoft Store Cross-platform: Steam (for applications) This is the easiest ...


4

If you are merely distributing the executable output of the Fortran compiler, and not the compiler itself, then you're not distributing the compiler, and therefore not triggering the GPL's copyleft provision. Under those conditions, you are not bound by the GPL. This is generally true of all compilers, unless your program requires the compiler's services ...


3

The MIT and BSD licenses allow you to use them as a library and still keep your work under any license you want. The GPL, on the other hand, doesn't allow this. When you use a GPL library, the whole project must be GPL. There is a special version of the GPL, the LGPL (Library GPL or Lesser GPL) which specifically allows to use the library in non-GPL projects....


3

No. You can't. That's a violation of the GPL and one can be sued for distributing software that uses the GPL'd library without making the source code of said library publicly available. The code that was freely given to the world came with the string that if you use it in a project, you have to freely give the project away. This is not the MIT or BSD open ...


3

I think Python's a reasonable candidate for a language with minimalism as one of its design goals. It's based around a relatively small number of core concepts, and version 3 attempted to, amongst other things, simplify the language a bit by removing some features. (Granted, that's not the same as a feature set that stayed the same from version 1, but I ...


3

You seem to misunderstand a key part: the unreal engine remains a commercial engine. This means that they will still get the licensing fees from every developer and each game sold. The EULA even specifically states that you can't share the source with anyone that isn't also a licensee. The major benefit is that there are now programmers that are paying you ...


3

This is venturing close to a request for legal advice, which we can't give. If you want to be really sure what is legally correct, consult a real lawyer. The way that copyright statements are generally used is that the initial copyright statement indicates who owned the copyright at the time that a work was created, with a year of creation. If the work is ...


3

I emailed the FSF licensing lab, and here is the response I received (NB: it was from a licensing volunteer, not from a lawyer, and does not constitute legal advice): Your obligations under sections 4 and 5 of the GPLv3 are to maintain the existing copyright notices. It has never been a requirement of the GPL to research, affirm or update the copyright ...


3

And, I am NOT going to distribute any GPL application (neither its sources) packaged together with CSCS. Copyright controls who is allowed to distribute something, not who is allowed to use it. If you don't distribute the GPL application, you can't infringe copyright, even if you depend strongly on it. Your user could infringe the conditions on which they ...


3

For copyright, a program and the data that the program operates on (or the data that come out of the program) are considered to be completely separate works and the copyright license of the one does not affect how you can license the other. The one exception is if the program copies (part of) its internals to the output. Then the output is considered to be a ...


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