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1

If the capabilities of your new ISA are similar to existing ones, then you can save a lot of work. For example, you could add a new backend to LLVM and get many programming languages for free. To do this, you would describe basic details of your ISA to the compiler (bit sizes of integers, pointers, floating point numbers). Your C code can then be compiled ...


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You are asking about the technique known as "tracing compiler": the interpreter gathers information about code execution, and incrementally builds low-level code using collected data. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tracing_just-in-time_compilation https://stefan-marr.de/papers/oopsla-marr-ducasse-meta-tracing-vs-partial-evaluation/ The difference from the ...


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One simple solution is to clone (check out) the project to a folder outside of C:\users, provided the developers have access to such folders. For example, instead of: C:\users\DEVELOPER_FULL_NAME\path simply create a new folder (C:\dev) and clone here: C:\dev\path Of course, as others have pointed out, you're still exposing exception messages and stack ...


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It is a common misbelieve among software engineers that switching to a newer compiler will automatically and always be "better" - whatever that means. In fact, such decisions require a cost-/benefit analysis - and depending on the outcome, it might turn out that is better to stay with the old compiler - or not. You should be open to both potential outcomes, ...


2

Now, I want to convince my manager to switch to a newer compiler. The standards compliance argument is too weak, i.e. there are no significant changes expected in that codebase for now. I was thinking more of a performance and perhaps a correctness / bug fixing angle. I see an important argument: GCC 4.3 is no more supported by the FSF. This is shown on the ...


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Presumably if technical arguments are lacking the reason you want the change is that you want the newer tech for your CV. The argument then for your manager is the same. Recruitment is harder when you use old tech.


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It is possible to unify this to a certain degree with a virtual machine as Charles Grant already pointed out. However, there is the issue with the law of leaky abstraction. Whatever you abstract away will leak through at some point. As long as you are just processing abstract data this is no problem. Every VM system is able to map concepts like strings, ...


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I know at least one "living" software product which is exactly developed this way: a generic high level language (in this case "AlgoPascal") is compiled to several different other high level languages (C++, C#, Delphi, CPython, there was also a VBA version in the past). So yes, this is definitely possible Of course, for this case of a scientific mathmatics ...


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I don't know of a "Higher-Order Operating System Layer" that abstracts all operating systems like Linux, Mac, and Windows, into one thing, so that you can use any of them without regard to the underlying implementation. This sounds exactly like what platforms like the Java Virtual Machine and Microsoft CLR do. Why didn't they do that? I'd say ...


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