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What comes to mind is Levenshtein distance algorithm. It computes the number of changes (insertions, deletions or substitutions) needed to transform one array into another. It is used in general to compare strings (not just to know if a string is equal or not to another one, but how close a string is to another), but can be adapted for virtually any array (...


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So, I would want to have clarity on what are the EXACT scalar and composite fields in JAVA? And why? It's strictly to do with the types defined in a .proto file. Java the language doesn't define the meaning here. Anything you have defined an enum or message for is composite. The built-in types are scalar. Elements that are defined required or optional ...


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The terms 'scalar type' or 'scalar field' are usually used to contrast them with compound types/fields. A compound type is easiest to define and it is a type that contains multiple distinct elements. These elements can have the same type, in which case the compound is an array or a list, or different types, in which case the compound is typically a struct or ...


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I am answering this for completeness. The resulting API design that I went with can be best illustrated with some example user code: from pyorama.core.app import * from pyorama.core.system import * from pyorama.core.world import * class EnemySystem(System): def init(self): pass def quit(self): pass def update(self): ...


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main called IsDoubleString, then IsDoubleString called IsDoubleString. When IsDoubleString returns, it returns to IsDoubleString because IsDoubleString called IsDoubleString. In fact IsDoubleString will return to IsDoubleString as many times as IsDoubleString called IsDoubleString... then IsDoubleString returns to main. That is probably confusing. So let us ...


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