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28

I understand the desire for a simple, no foolin' around statement of what you intend, but there's no point in having a EULA at all if it's not going to do the job that it's supposed to do, which is to protect your rights and to define what the user is and isn't allowed to do. Legal language is like computer code -- it should unambiguously define your intent ...


14

It's not entirely unprecedented. SQL Server is limited by users/server/database size, etc., effectively limiting its use as a client'server platform, and it's essentially a programming environment (albeit one with a rich data infrastructure). Many software libraries routinely limit the way programmers can use them, in a variety of ways. In practice, ...


6

You can do this. What you want to do is called cloning a software. Considering that your server and the original server aren't even in the same programming language, your server is a completely new piece of work and you have all the rights to it. At least in the united states, the DMCA grants a safe harbor to reverse engineer software for the purposes of ...


6

I need to add an EULA to my (commercial) software but I cannot afford a lawyer. Well, this site isn't a lawyer either. You need to hire one. If you can't afford it, then your project is fundamentally mismanaged and it's not something that can be fixed here. There's a reason that most companies offer EULAs that are six trillion pages long, and it's usually ...


6

Java has long had a restriction against use in nuclear facilities, although the JDK6 license agreement softened the terms slightly (I recall the older variants being much more explicit): You acknowledge that Licensed Software is not designed or intended for use in the design, construction, operation or maintenance of any nuclear facility. Oracle ...


5

It depends on whether you read the source code of the Minecraft server and translate it "word for word", then your code is basically a modification of the Minecraft code. If instead you only see what the server does and then invent your own code to do the same thing, you're fine. This is why in the past sometimes code has been playing by companies using ...


5

Frankly, I recommend that you don't waste your time starting any new development in VFP: As a developer, you'd need a full license for VFP - a dead product. VFP 9 "will be supported by Microsoft through 2015." (Source: Alan Grivier, Microsoft). VFP is now in maintenance mode and is not going to be enhanced or updated VFP apps can't be ported to 64-bit and ...


4

Let's take a look at what you plan to write: You may redistribute the trial version of this software If you buy a license, you may not redistribute it or sell it This is the basic information about the license under which you're distributing the software. It should be somewhere the users can easily find it, but doesn't have to be an annoying ...


4

You need few things: 1. Copy right notice: Any work originated by any author in any field first requires a proof of its author ship. This is similar to publisher putting a simple copyright text Copy right 2012, m0s . This is enough to be carried along with text file in your source or binary package. However, it is better if you have it in About dialog box ...


3

µTorrent is a free program - but not OSS - you should take a look at its EULA.


2

The usual IANAL applies - for legal advice, consult a lawyer. That said, my understanding is that a domain name or a website are not themselves legal persons, and thus cannot close any legally binding agreements. Natural persons and corporations can, and the way these things are usually done is by defining the domain name or website URL as the legal person ...


2

Side note: Depends on the country you want to sell your software. Most EULAs are designed for the legal situation in the US, in other countries those EULAs may not be applicable. E.g. in Germany many EULAs (even from big companies like Microsoft) are simply invalid, either because they weren't provided to the end user before purchase or because some single ...


2

There are two main considerations for which license to choose for your application You must be comfortable with the license terms (the freedoms/restrictions given to users/modifiers of your software) The chosen license must be compatible with the licenses of all the libraries you use. This rules out the GPL license in your case, because it is incompatible ...


2

Well a product being used for illegal, unethical or immoral activities can very much be their business. If a user of your software used said software to to assist him in a criminal or damaging act then you the creator of the software are on the long line of parties being sued or potentially even prosecuted. By stating the intended use and the explicit uses ...


2

I am not a lawyer, but I would have thought that a port of the existing code constitutes a modification of it so is covered by Any tools you write for the Game from scratch belong to you. . Modifications to the Game ("Mods") (including pre-run Mods and in-memory Mods) and plugins for the Game also belong to you and you can do whatever you want with them, ...


1

I have no idea how they got the code; but how legal is it to distribute something which derives from that code basde on the claim that the code was obtained from publicly-accessible websites which published it under a relatively permissive license? Not legal at all. If the publicly-accessible website didn't have the right to distribute it under a FOSS ...


1

Barts answer is perfectly correct. I just want to add my own rider. Please read the licence and make your own decision. If you don't understand it, then perhaps you should pay a lawyer to read it for you. The basic breakdown is this. If you make no money out of it and harm no-one then just do your best, acknowledge the work of others and don't worry too ...


1

You say "registered company", so you're not here in the USA, where we have corporations, LLCs, partnerships, doing-business-as ("DBAs"), etc. Most places where there are registered companies are British Commonwealth countries, where there is usually some organization like the UK's Companies House that is the registrar. Such places have very strict laws ...


1

The price you charge (0$) is an economic consideration, not (directly*) a legal one. That means you don't need a special kind of license. A normal EULA will suffice. * When it does matter in legal matters, it will be to your advantage. Your users are not entitled to high expectations given the low price - but that would still hold if you'd charge $0.99, ...


1

No. It is not okay to use a short EULA. The justice system is adversarial and your adversary is human. If you can make your adversary weary, confused, and doubtful then you must. You are not writing software or constructing a building where efficiency is a consideration and costs have to be justified. The words in a contract can be compared to spam and it is ...


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