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13 votes

How does Agile avoid having a project stall when close to completion (the 90 percent syndrome)?

Agile deals with this by not doing that last 10% at all. We do the most important (valuable) work first, so by time you've worked your way through that first 90%, it's extremely likely that the last ...
RubberDuck's user avatar
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11 votes

How does Agile avoid having a project stall when close to completion (the 90 percent syndrome)?

Alistair Cockburn has a good article here that talks about this with the analogy of packing up a home for moving. Essentially I think the problem you are describing is when you ask the team to report ...
JimmyJames's user avatar
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7 votes

How does Agile avoid having a project stall when close to completion (the 90 percent syndrome)?

Agile deals with it in extremely simple way : It doesn't have "schedule". As I described in this answer; 90/90 happens when you are trying to build your schedule based on "happy path", only to find ...
Euphoric's user avatar
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7 votes
Accepted

User stories - Different formats for different purposes?

The classical user-story describes a desired feature from the point of view of a user. It is very synthetic in view of the 3 C: stories are written on a Card, they are the promise for a Conversation ...
Christophe's user avatar
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7 votes
Accepted

Making pull requests easier to review while practicing XP and refactoring

You wrote When someone says "this will need a lot of testing", I show them how I got there So they could not get the information "how you got there" easily from the commit logs, you had to ...
Doc Brown's user avatar
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6 votes

Making pull requests easier to review while practicing XP and refactoring

I don't know how else to answer this question except by personal experience. I have a similar circumstance, although my colleagues are probably less willing to complain about my pull requests, owing ...
Tajh Taylor's user avatar
4 votes

User stories - Different formats for different purposes?

The format As a [role], I want to [do] such that [benefit] for user stories is known as the Connextra format, after the company where it was developed and used. The original concept of user stories ...
Thomas Owens's user avatar
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4 votes
Accepted

What is the origin of TDD?

The term of test driven development is borrowed from XP which leads us directly to Kent Beck. Browsing through specialised literature shows that the terms of TDD, test driven design, test first ...
Christophe's user avatar
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3 votes
Accepted

TDD on an already started project

TDD is less a testing but more a coding technique. The question you need to ask here is not "shall I test this class or not" but "I want to implement a small change in my code base, how can ...
Doc Brown's user avatar
  • 209k
3 votes

How does Agile avoid having a project stall when close to completion (the 90 percent syndrome)?

Easy: Don't ever ask for progress on a task as a percentage. Waterfall is based on the assumption that you know up front what have to be done - so you can measure how far along the way you are. In ...
JacquesB's user avatar
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2 votes

Where are all the small functions supposed to go in XP?

XP is a fairly loose collection of best practices and ideas, with the underlying idea to take them to the “extreme”, i.e. to take them seriously and practice them fully. Keeping functions small is ...
amon's user avatar
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1 vote

Where are all the small functions supposed to go in XP?

You are looking for an organizing principle. Unfortunately there isn't a one size fits all answer here. However, there are options to consider. You mentioned one: Alphabetize. This helps when code is ...
candied_orange's user avatar
1 vote

Pair Rotation in a team for effective pair programming

One thing I would consider is the size of your stories. Can you break them down into smaller chunks, so that it is easier for new pair combinations to pick up? Are you frequently running into a single ...
Keith McDaniel's user avatar
1 vote

Programming by Intention, Depth-First or Breadth-First?

I follow Robert C. Martin's Step-down Rule. In his book Clean Code, he writes: We want the code to read like a top-down narrative. We want every function to be followed by those at the next level ...
Martin Omander's user avatar
1 vote

User stories are too high level and conceptual, management expects developers to fill in the blanks

You are correct. User stories are too high level for actual work that goes into a sprint/increment. They are essentially what waterfall calls a user requirement and are good for describing the big ...
North Gork's user avatar
1 vote

Why has extreme programming (XP) gone out of date in favor of Agile, Kanban etc?

Agile is more marketable because it involves different stakeholders with different roles and responsibilities related to the software building process. When in its second edition Kent Beck enlarged ...
Billal Begueradj's user avatar

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