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8

Open Source works best when there is a community behind the code. That means getting people interested in it. I would do a pre-alpha release and be really clear about the state of things. I.e. what you are confident in, what you are not confident in. Attempt to get people to start helping in the community. As you build out the test suite (hopefully with ...


7

There are a couple ways I get ideas for things to work on. As you go through your normal life, think of useful programs that might be nice to have and then make a note of the idea. That way, when you have a need to learn a new technology, you can look at this list rather than trying to come up with an idea from a blank slate. Here are the ways I do it. ...


6

Your only route is to abandon any desires of "open source" with your software. There are no "mainstream" or common suitable open source licenses as freedom to use for any purpose, which includes competing against you, is considered a cornerstone requirement of free and open source software. And of course if you use any libraries you'll have to check if a ...


6

The AGPL has a clause in it that specifically closes the loophole of the application (because it is a web application) not actually being distributed. All users are granted access to all of the application's source code. However, if you can demonstrate that iText is not required for your application to function, but merely adds an additional feature to it,...


5

All of us are short on time, but somehow manage to find it for our pet projects. The reason? There is usually a problem that needs solving or a cool tool/feature we want that is not readily available elsewhere. Without this spark of inspiration, you're going to find it that much harder to get going. If I were in your shoes, I'd maybe find a piece of ...


5

You could add a license term similar to the term from the Affero GPL v3 mentioned here: if you run the program on a server and let other users communicate with it there, your server must also allow them to download the source code corresponding to the program that it's running You could also consider to put your programs fully under Affero GPL v3, or ...


4

Adding a license file and the license header to each source file should be okay though I would add my full name to the Copyright notice.


4

Given the license soup described above, can I even release my code under a single license, or should/must each part of it (mine and everybody else's) have a separate license? Both. GPLv3 requires your work "as a whole" to be licensed under GPLv3 as well. Parallel to this, the parts can (and must, if you obey their terms) stay under their own license. ...


4

The most direct way would be to set up a public forum for your lib where you can discuss such things. You could also bring a new "2.0 experimental" branch in place where you demonstrate how the new design and the new API will look like. Also, add deprecation marks into your current "1.x" version line of your lib at the appropriate places like the API docs. ...


3

I believe you should look at Technology adoption life cycle: For you, the innovators and early adopters are the most important groups. Innovators are tinkerers. They play and try things. They don't care about things working, as they are often willing to fix the problems themselves. They are willing to take on risks of things not working on themselves. For ...


2

The D programming language is open source (at least if using the open source gdc and ldc compilers, see info on this here). It was designed to fix the deficiencies in C++, such as adding (optional) garbage collection and making the language a lot simpler and safe to use, while still being statically compiled for optimal performance. It is thus combines of ...


2

Your question looks like career advice so might be off-topic here. I am sometimes working on free software, but I am not an expert on that. First, most major (or large and significant) free software (Linux kernel, GCC compiler, Firefox browser) are mostly (but not entirely) developed by paid professionals. In other words, the idea that major free software ...


2

it's 1 -> 2 -> 3 -> 4 -> 1 and thus on and on in a vicious cycle It's not a vicious cycle. It has a very clear starting point: you wrote the code. If you wrote the code, then it stands to reason you understood its purpose. If you understand its purpose, then you can write tests. Testing is nothing more than checking to see if the written code fulfills the ...


1

It is highly unlikely you will ever get anybody to write unit-tests for your code for free - even if they like your library and find it useful. Think about why you don't write the tests yourself: You find it "boring and annoying". Nevertheless, you are the one who have the most to gain from the unit-tests and they are much easier for you to write than for ...


1

First of all, IANAL. If you need advice that you can rely on as being legally sound, then you should get it from a lawyer who specializes in international Copyright and IP law. I can think of three possible approaches: Don't publish your source code at all. AFAIK, no open source licenses require you to do that. Publish your modifications to the upstream ...


1

If you look at other software that makes use of FOSS you'll usually find the information available through the about option in the menu. For an example have a look at the Chrome or Firefox about screen/page.


1

What you're asking is if you can make a VM appliance/image that includes proprietary software. I don't see why not, after all, most people using GNU/Linux and Ubuntu will install the proprietary Flash plugin. People also include proprietary data within their images when they distribute them. Check out the VirtualBox Licensing FAQ Of course, this is all ...


1

You can also call the file COPYING. If you have contributors and depending on your license, you will also need to list their name for the copyright or get them to assign their copyright to you.


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