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37

The problem is that in order to call something "Java" you need to get it certified as compliant to the Java spec. One of the pre-requisites of getting this certification is running you JVM through a test suite - Java Technology Compatibility Kit (TCK). This test suite is NOT open sourced. So you can build a JVM that behaves in a very Java like way and be ...


37

There are different ways to use UML. Martin Fowler calls these UML modes and identifies four: UML as Notes, UML as Sketch, UML as Blueprint, and UML as a Programming Language. UML as a Programming Language never really took off. There has been some work in this area under different names, like Model Driven Architecture or Model Based Software Engineering. ...


33

Unfortunately there is little you can do. I think you have the answers on your last paragraph. As far as making claims on your web site about other sources - put an app signature on your site, explain than some "less than desirable" sites are listing your apps and it should only be downloaded from <here> or <here>. Do not name or provide any ...


31

I would take a look at Fossil. It is the system the developers of sqlite use, internally, apparently. It also uses sqlite, which is a good solid technology... that is nice and portable - as well as simple and reliable. It has a good, if austere user-interface (which i think behooves the nature of a productivity-oriented goal such as you describe). ((Be ...


19

My simple rule is never to work for free. But this doesn't mean I always work for money. If I work for them, I ask them to give something in return. It might be even just be symbolic, like coming over and buying pizza if I spend an afternoon helping them typeset their thesis in LaTeX. A friend used to give me tennis classes and I helped him with his website. ...


16

Gitorious is open source and you can install it on your own server using scripts provided by the Gitorious community edition (see http://www.getgitorious.com/installer). Gitorious now has support for wikis and issue tracking. There is also a Docker image available for quickly getting it running. Another option would be Gitlab which is basically a GitHub ...


16

Your friend is wrong. First, the GPL only requires to disclose your source code to your customers when your software runs on their machines. Your load balancer runs on your own hardware, so you don't need to provide the sourcecode to anyone who connects to it. There is a variant of the GPL which requires to disclose the sourcecode to everyone who "interacts ...


15

You should have read this answer before it was removed about which one to use. The main answer stated: About Java 7, note that JDK7 and OpenJDK7 will have (nearly) identical code base. Notice the nearly I highlighted. From the article linked from that answer: […] but there is some code where there are open source replacements where we still use the ...


15

There are two answers here, because there are two principal ways to look at this. First, sometimes free software thrives in competition with proprietary software because it wasn't designed to make money in the first place. That's not the only thing that motivates people, after all. But if you're looking for a way to monetize free software, you're ...


12

"Free" is a pretty vaguely defined word, and you'll never find a definition with which absolutely everyone agrees. In the case of Java, a lot of doubt probably stems from the fact that the JDK used to be partially closed source - the OpenJDK project was started only in 2006. Some of hte things you read may be from before that time. With the GLP-licensed ...


11

Java itself has been opened sourced, so in that respect it is free. Some library implementations are open source, some are not. The ones from Sun have been opened sourced with the rest of the language. As for the software you write - that's up to you.


11

If you are going to do a free website, do it understanding that it will not give you any benefits beyond helping a friend. In my experience, the whole "it gets your name out there" argument is pretty much garbage. I've done a half dozen websites for free, and have never had a paying job come of it. Nor did I expect one. If people ask me to do a website ...


9

It's really a case by case thing. There are many variables affecting your decision to charge or not: Time: How much time will it take you to complete it. Delivery: When is it expected to be delivered? Is there pressure to finish? Profit: Is the project meant for profit? If someone is goind to make money of it, why can't you as well? Relationship: How close ...


8

I would be wary of doing free projects for friends and family. They tend to snowball and go down hill quickly. How do you tell one friend sure, but then when the next asks you say no. Can lead to some strained relations Doing free work for other projects that aren't for friends and family can be beneficial. You may not only learn new technologies and ...


8

Your constraints are pretty specific, but I think you can get the results you seek with ChiliProject + plugins. ChiliProject is a fork of Redmine that uses updated versions of Ruby/Rails. It supports git and mercurial very well, and replicates the Github Issues functionality it looks like you're seeking by parsing commit messages (i.e., refs 291 in a commit ...


8

The open source business model is not much about selling lots of copies to many individual customers. This model would not be sustainable, because each of your customers could compete with you and underbid you. But there are other business models which allow you to make money from open source software: Support and consulting fees: Your software may be free,...


8

Lets use Linux as example, It's not an Object Oriented project, some parts, like the VFS can be modelled in UML, but others can't be or not very effective, i.e. basically just a straight translation from struct into a class diagram with no relationships. UML is good for documentation, to get some one new to a project gets up to speed. That is not something ...


7

No, there are no free-software licenses that I am aware of that would impose such a requirement. If there were you wouldn't be under any obligation to use that license but instead pick one of the others. The client and server could even be under different licenses if you like. Also, if no license suited your needs, you are free to create your own. As the ...


7

Allura http://sf.net/p/allura should fit the bill. It is the platform for all the new (or upgraded) projects at SourceForge and is open source. It supports Mercurial and wikis, plus many more tools (Git, SVN, ticket tracker, forums, etc). It doesn't quite have "code review" but does support forking and merge requests for Mercurial and Git repos. It's ...


7

Perhaps a better solution would be: Give your program to qualified individuals without condition. Ask them to consider returning the favor by allowing you to distribute open-source stuff that they develop for use with your product. You'll be dealing with people who already have a proven track record of giving away their code, so there's a good chance that ...


7

Creative Commons licenses should not be used for software. From the FAQ: Can I apply a Creative Commons license to software? We do not recommend it. Creative Commons licenses should not be used for software. We strongly encourage you to use one of the very good software licenses which are already available. We recommend considering licenses made ...


6

For the exact same issue at work we use an ecosystem composed of: Redmine for issue tracking RhodeCode for repository management Jenkins for continuous integration and deployment (we have jobs for deployment and upgrade tasks that can be assigned permissions in a granular fashion, and you get the audit trail for free) Active Directory for authentication (...


6

I would suggest to make your Trial version first and spread it for FREE. After your product become solid to be commercial (may take 6-12 months) you release a commercial version where you should support your paid customers. Selling free software is logically non-sense. You may provide support service for open-source free software and charge for it, but not ...


6

The GPL is "free" for certain definitions of the word "free". One major restriction of it is that you are not free to do the wrong thing - you simply can't take a bunch of GPL code, incorporate it in a program that's not under a GPL-compatible license, and release the result as proprietary software. That's not truly "free", and in order to ensure that GPL ...


6

I would recommend neither. Go full open-source for this one project. Your first public software release is primarily a learning experience, and you'll learn more from an open-source project than from a free trial. You need to get some experience managing your user community, predicting and responding to needs, and understanding how people will use the things ...


5

The term "freeware" (rather than the ambiguous "free software") is often used to indicate software that is free of charge but not necessarily supplied with other freedoms. However, freeware usually often carries the connotation of "free to distribute". The adjective "gratis" is used by the FSF to unambiguously indicate "zero monetary cost". However, people ...


5

It sounds like you need a license which requires any downstream changes to be submitted back to you. I don't know of any that include this clause, you may need to have a lawyer write a custom license for you. Open source projects that accept contributions from other developers oftentimes have the developers sign "contributor agreements" in which the ...


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