Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

New answers tagged

0

Assume four points A = (ax, ay), B = (bx, by), C = (cx, cy), D = (dx, dy), and they form the points of a square in anti-clockwise ordering. We move the points so that A is at (0, 0) by subtracting ax from bx, cx, and dx, and subtracting ay from by, cy, and dy, setting ax = ay = 0. If the points are exactly the corners of a square in anti-clockwise ordering,...


0

Basic idea (this answers the question of whether I was contributing something new, which was asked by the bot when I clicked to provide an answer): a rhombus with equal diagonals is a square. "simple as possible" includes: no division, no square roots, no branching, no searching, no angle-checking or -chasing, no vectors, no transformations, no complex ...


1

Approximate fit? How about the exact circle? First you want to guard against some annoying edge cases: No two points should be identical. Duplicate points contribute no additional information. Ergo you trio is down to two... The points should not be on the same straight line. Grab a circle and try and draw a line that intersects the circles three times. ...


1

You said approximate, not best fit, so a simple approach is likely called for. I'm going to decompose this into three problems for you: Find the radius given 3 points Feed your array of points to the first problem 3 at a time, advancing by 1 each time Find the statistical average of a multitude of points Fair warning, I haven't read the Scientific paper ...


Top 50 recent answers are included