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63

Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity. -- Robert J Hanlon. That, and a lack of communication. So, it's not a conspiracy of anti-ISO sentiment making people think "I know, I'll use UK instead of GB", nor is it an inclination that "they know better", or even a sense that the standard is no good. It'll be entirely because ...


32

When I program in Ruby, I generally always ignore the ISO Ruby standard. Why? Because it's incredibly restrictive! ISO Ruby is a minimal subset of the intersection of Ruby 1.8 and Ruby 1.9. The current version of Ruby, which is supported by all Ruby implementations (or at least will be very soon) is Ruby 2.1, and it has many features that make programming ...


22

Per your example, "GB" is the country code for the United Kingdom. However, "UK" was the at one time the MARC (US Library of Congress) standard code, although I believe that's deprecated. And the IANA uses .uk for the top-level domain for the United Kingdom. So, if something doesn't conform to an ISO standard, it doesn't mean that no standard is being ...


17

In IEEE Std 1016 Section 3.1 Software design in context, you can find this paragraph: An SDD can be prepared and used in a variety of design situations. Typically, an SDD is prepared to support the development of a software item to solve a problem, where this problem has been expressed in terms of a set of requirements. The contents of the SDD can ...


15

Compliance with an ISO standard is not always a cost-free activity. If a particular standard isn't already implemented in the toolkit she's using, a programmer is faced with a necessary choice: Is it cheaper to properly implement this now, or not implement the standard and deal with conversions later? It's easy to say "hey, you should always implement the ...


14

In the case of inexperienced programmers/database designers, it's because of not knowing. They tend to reinvent the wheel because they don't know a group of people spanning industries, already discussed the issue and came up with an standard approved by all who participated, often after very long discussions, revisions, etc. Recently a co-worker of mine ...


13

I would assume the auditors would prefer that developers log in as themselves and not as some "pair" which has a shared password. The risk should be obvious--a developer adds some malicious code as "PairA" and puts someone else's initials in the comment (or doesn't comment it at all). How do you trace back to the malicious developer? I'd recommend that ...


10

Well, people tend to ignore ISO standards: for example, you wrote if you use the ISO standard you just store 20140201* and it's unambiguously February 1st. but the fully ISO8601-compliant rendition is in fact 2014-02-01. (see also xkcd 1179)


8

I'm going to preface my answer with the fact that my expertise is in AS9100 and AS9115. AS9100 is the aerospace industry standard that incorporates additional aerospace industry requirements with ISO 9001. The revision of AS9100 that I'm familiar with is AS9100C, which corresponds to ISO9001:2008. There may be minor differences between the two. The first ...


8

Why would I not use ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 country codes? Because I use STANAG 1059 country codes... and in that UK is the code for the United Kingdom (instead of GB as per ISO 3166-1). Alternatively I could use the FIPS country codes - again UK is the country code for the United Kingdom. There are many standards (ISO and non-ISO) and sometimes a particular ...


8

One of the reasons is that the application domain and the users might not use these standards themselves. Even when some domains use some standards, some of them might have made different choices than the ISO standards, often for historical reasons. If your users already use "UK" in their existing procedures(1) to refer to "United Kingdom of Great Britain ...


8

It depends on the usage, but I'd probably say it's safest to convert to UTC then pass the ISO 8601 style string as you suggest. That way, it's human-readable, and you don't have to worry about different time zones, etc. While I was researching for an answer, I found an interesting answer on StackOverflow you might want to read: link. (edit) Also, if you'...


8

If all you are looking for from the SDD is to communicate the design with others, then yes, you can create it after development. Only thing is, it is then called documentation. However, I would like to point out that an SDD can serve another purpose as well. It can also help you to reason about design and make sure you "fail fast". This is a good thing, ...


7

Storing 20140201 is not unambiguous at all. Only when you include the knowledge that is following the ISO standard does it become unambiguous. The same goes for 01/02/2014: when you include the knowledge that the format is mm/dd/yyyy it is also perfectly unambiguous. As long as the application does not have to interface with other application any well ...


7

I would keep the accounts as they are, typically only one person is driving, and even if the other person uses the machine (unofficially) the person logged in should still be aware of what is happening on their machine. Checkins would still need comments to show who the pair was however.


7

Note: when some important missing characters (such as the Euro symbol €) were added to the character set to create ISO8859-15, some mostly unused characters had to go, and this included the letter-free diacritics. So, the designers of ISO8859-1 may have been very smart people and may have had good reasons, but apparently nobody understood them! However, ...


6

Instead of creating separate accounts so that work is not locked to a possibly absent user, use your version control system. When a pair starts working, create a task branch. Commit code to the task branch whenever the tests pass. When the task is complete, merge back and close the task branch.


5

A point not raised so far is the cultural appropriateness of international standards. Consider the international standard for measurements. Let's present those to users in the United States. I'm not sure all your US users will be happy about kilometres, kilograms, and litres. Consider that international standards are written by governments. If the ...


5

In my experience programmers fail to use ISO standards for a variety of stated reasons, e.g.: "I didn't know that there was an ISO standard" (ceases to be a valid reason once you're told!) "The standard is inaccessible (can't find /afford a copy)" (really??) "The standard is too restrictive" (usually if the standard says "don't" then there's a good reason. ...


5

Up until now this has worked fine for us, but my company is currently going through a ISO 27001 audit ISO 27001 or not, your current system only works because you're a small company where there's a high degree of communication and mutual trust. That sort of thing doesn't scale up very well, so you'd probably have to consider other options at some point in ...


5

Is there a general requirement discovering in SCRUM? Like interviews, surveys with the client and then those stack of requirements are shared with the team in the multiple sprint meetings for the backlog or it's a continue discovering with the team and the stakeholders (users stories in the sprint meetings) Scrum is silent on the specific methods. The ...


4

I work in financial domain, and I understand there are different conventions to follow these corner cases. Follow Wikipedia article Day Count Convention for details. ISO_8601 does not have any specific value for month as duration, but the link The Mathematics of the ISO 8601 Calendar suggest month as 30.6, year as 365.25, with additional handling for leap ...


4

Software or system security hugely depends on the type of system being designed, the data it stores and the regulatory/contractual environment it is used in. Most organizations often cannot articulate the level of security required in the systems they produce, either. Personally, I think about security on three levels. First is the highest level: the ...


4

ISO based Latin-1 on ECMA-094, which based it on the DEC Multinational Character Set so Europeans could use the DEC VT220. The first 128 code points of every 8-bit character set had to be the same as ASCII for backward-compatibility. Indeed, back in the bad old days, misconfigured network hardware often interpreted the high bit as an error-correction code ...


4

Scrum does not tell you how to develop software, it merely dictates moments of communication and ways to transfer information among stakeholders. Scrum is not a software development methodology, you can apply anything you like or are required to as long as you do the planning sessions, stand-ups, demos, maintain the burndown on the wall and assign your roles ...


3

I am a medical doctor and a freelance ISO Auditor in the USA. I feel it is not fair to say that the ISO per se is a failure. It depends on how the company looks at it. If you are determined to marry the certificate alone yes they cannot achieve much,but we cannot blame the standard for it. You can achieve a lot if only you have quality processes in place. ...


3

In doing my own research on the topic, I found this document published by ISO. It covers eight quality management principles: Customer Focus Leadership Involvement of people Process approach System approach to management Continual improvement Factual approach to decision making Mutually beneficial supplier relationships The document itself goes into ...


3

Is there a general requirement discovering in SCRUM? Not expressly, no. To quote Henrik Kneiberg: "The beginning of the project is when you know the least, so why would you plan everything then?" The whole idea of Scrum is that the needs of the user and the "right" design is emergent. The requirements gather process is ongoing. That being said, it is ...


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