135

As of npm 3.10 you have to use UNLICENSED: { "license": "UNLICENSED"} or { "license": "SEE LICENSE IN <filename>"} The value of license must either one of the options above or the identifier for the license from this list of SPDX licenses. Any other value is not valid. The following is no longer valid for current versions of npm For npm versions ...


110

3 reasons why: According to the terms of the GPL, people accessing GitHub via the web is not considered releasing (or propagating in GPLv3 terms), and so GitHub is not required to share their source code. If GitHub was to sell a version of their service (which they might do, I haven't bothered to look) where they send you their software and you run an ...


95

First, the answer is no (for a translation), you cannot legally relicense it or do anything outside of the original license legalities. You may very well have done 10 times the work of the original author, but it doesn't matter, it is viral. Not just because it is GPL, but because it isn't clean design or rewrite. I struggled briefly with this in 1992 when ...


74

First off, I Am Not A Lawyer. But I have studied many licenses and understand issues concerning them. Second, I know this is an old question, but I think it still is a point of confusion and concern. If it ISN'T a point of concern, it should be. Choosing a license is a big deal that you can't trivially change down the road, especially if multiple ...


63

Yes, this is covered by the MIT license and you should contact the author of the derivative work to correct the copyright notice. More precisely, with MIT license, you allow everyone: to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, So, someone can modify and enhance your original software. In this ...


43

The commercial software would need to include the copyright notice for the work it has used. It doesn't mean the entire commercial work is then licensed under the MIT license. For example, I would expect to see the copyright notice for the commercial software, with the following wording added: This software includes the Yannbane Awesome Library: ...


41

The problem is that in order to call something "Java" you need to get it certified as compliant to the Java spec. One of the pre-requisites of getting this certification is running you JVM through a test suite - Java Technology Compatibility Kit (TCK). This test suite is NOT open sourced. So you can build a JVM that behaves in a very Java like way and be ...


41

It looks like size of your client is important. From Visual Studio 2013 and MSDN Licensing Whitepaper - November-2014 page 10: "Example 2: A Fortune 500 firm has outsourced the development of its store-locator mobile application to a small agency. The application is not an open source project. The agency has 5 employees working on the project and would ...


36

That year in your code is part of a copyright notice. It indicates the effective creation date of your software, which affects the time window of your copyright. It is not, strictly speaking, related to the license (although the MIT license happens to include a provision that the copyright notice must be preserved in all copies of the software). You should ...


35

That would not be an Open Source license by the definition of the Open Source Initiative: 5. No Discrimination Against Persons or Groups The license must not discriminate against any person or group of persons. Rationale: In order to get the maximum benefit from the process, the maximum diversity of persons and groups should be equally ...


34

It depends on which license. There are some free software licenses that are specifically designed to prevent people from doing stuff like that, such as the GNU GPL. They're known as "viral" licenses, because their licensing terms spread to any code you use them with, which keeps you from using a GPL library in a non-GPL (or compatible) program. Other ...


34

Can I use them in my commercial app? It depends on what you intend to do with the software that you produce. Firstly, neither ASL1, GPL or LGPL make any restrictions on what you can use software to do inside your organization. The restrictions are all on code that is distributed outside of your organization. For GPL the restriction is that if you ...


34

Copyright licenses only specify what others can do with your code. If you are the copyright holder of the code, then you have all the rights to do with that code as you like and that includes using the code in ways that is not permitted for others. You are the copyright holder if you wrote the code yourself and it was not written as part of your job or ...


34

There exist software projects that use a license like this. However, these would not be considered free licenses by the OSI definition. More importantly, the enforceability of these licenses has been strongly questioned every time I've seen them mentioned, and they have never, to the best of my knowledge, been tested in court. Using such a license is ...


33

Many open source applications have closed source licensing options for just this scenario. How much you charge them is dependent on: the size of the company (how much can they afford) what they're going to do with it (if they're stealing it or just using it) what they expect you to do (support/updates/extensions? what contractual level?) a ton of other ...


32

So long as you retain the copyright to all the code that is part of FooSuite (this gets problematic if you've incorporated code from the community unless you got the contributors to assign their copyright to you), you are free to distribute the code under as many different licenses as you'd like. So you could release FooSuite 1.1 under a different license. ...


32

This scenario is covered in the GPL FAQ: What does the GPL say about translating some code to a different programming language? Under copyright law, translation of a work is considered a kind of modification. Therefore, what the GPL says about modified versions applies also to translated versions.


29

As you have asked for a chart of Open source licenses comparison: Please, read this excellent article too: Adopting an Open Source Approach to Software Development, Distribution, and Licensing.


28

You need to take into account that open sourcing your code might require additional effort. As an example, in this blog entry Sun/Oracle engineer describes efforts they had to take when open sourcing their code: Open Source or Dirty Laundry? As we get ready to dive into the open source world, one of the many activities that's occurring is the ...


28

Open an editor. Write terms of license. Save file. Include in project. Generally speaking, that's all there is to it. Seriously. Don't believe me? Check out Phil Sturgeon's Don't Be A Dick license (as well as the WTFPL that inspired it). That said, it's hit or miss whether software licenses are legally enforceable, even if a lawyer wrote them (at least in ...


28

One way I know to get such information is by using PowerShell in the Package Manager Console, from within Visual Studio. The Package Manager Console is a PowerShell console within Visual Studio used to interact with NuGet and automate Visual Studio. Basically you can use the Get-Package cmdlet to get a list of packages referenced in a specific project (...


27

CLAs generally exist to do several things: They keep you from revoking your code down the road. In countries that are signatory t to the Bern convention, authors exclusively retain copyright on all original works, with others allowed to copy it only with explicit permission. A CLA makes you give that permission explicitly—and frequently in ...


27

How would one enforce such a license? Would you prohibit any military use? If the software checks air pressure in tires, and someone decides to use it on a military Hummer, is that a prohibited use? Can people in the military industrial complex use it to plan their monthly picnic? Would it be an acceptable use if the software improved ballistic missile ...


27

The restrictions in copyleft licenses like the GPL apply to modified versions of your code as well as your original code. So they can't just tweak the whitespace or brace style and then delete your license statement. However, you can't patent/copyright/copyleft/whatever an "algorithm" in its most abstract sense. You can put a license on your favorite ...


26

When you look at the current market, there are already licenses that have stipulations about what the software might be used for. Apple has a stipulation in their iTunes license which says you're not allowed to use it to develop nuclear weapons. the game Far Cry 2 has a stipulation in the license that you're not allowed to use it contrary to morality or ...


25

First of all, as others have said, there's a difference between software actually working versus software being sold with a legal guarantee that it works. The disclaimer text you cite means that the original licensor you got the software from does not grant any kind of warranty. You can offer the software yourself with a warranty attached. The original ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible