8

The answer of DougM and AER makes a fair point. MPLv2 and LGPLv3 with static exception are the same regarding the events that would trigger the copyleft. However, I think we are missing another very important difference between LGPL and MPL. When the copyleft is triggered, the copyleft applies to: for MPL: to the very exact same files of your original ...


7

Scanning through all the four articles you linked to, it seems they are written from a perspective where the rule to keep "master" intact is assumed to be so basic that it is not worth mentioning. In fact, this rule does not only apply to "master". It applies to every branch which is shared for collaborative work between two or more people of the team, or a ...


4

services that are not internally developed and maintained but still play a part in the overall system environment Components/parts/whatever that your team/company/etc. did not develop themselves but got from another party (could be another team within the same company, depending on your scope), are commonly referred to as "third party" components/parts/...


4

ISBN Database https://isbndb.com/isbn-database - there is a "basic" plan, limited to 5000 daily calls (more than enough for the intended use). How do you know that 5000 daily requests is enough for the intended use, when your software is open source and you have no way of knowing who uses it or how heavily they use it? If the key is in your source,...


4

In programming terms, what defines Open Source? With respect to licensing, the most frequently referenced definitions are the Open Source Initiative's (OSI) Open Source Definition or the Free Software Foundation's (FSF) Free Software Definition. The only restriction I want to have is if anyone, including companies, wants to make a profit of it, making it ...


3

The license itself gives you your answer. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution. So yes, you must include the license text in your docs, or put it in the about box, or similar.


2

To always make sure your main branch (usually master), is always fully functioning. I agree with you. As an external contractor who has to go through rigorous code reviews (3 people!) before my pull request is accepted, it is infuriating to see the company employees check in broken code that they never even once ran (e.g. blatant nullreferences - passes ...


2

If you use a rate limited, or charged per request API in your project you need to hide that API behind one of your own rather than use it directly. This is somewhat obvious when you consider public websites, but lets consider your desktop software used within a single company example. Here, the company has API keys for the APIs and the desktop software could ...


1

In the "Javascript world", there isn't one broadly accepted standard for folders and project hierarchies. But there are tons of frameworks for different purposes, and several of them impose a specific folder layout. So the best recommendation here I can give you here is: find a few other existing libs or frameworks of comparable size and / or ...


1

From a software engineering point of view, others have explained that shipping source code with an API key is a rather bad idea. If you have to meet the terms of some open source license, then you need to check whether shipping source code that you know doesn’t work out of the box is Ok according to the license. Of course you could add some code that lets an ...


1

When you are talking about an open source product, the versioning and release schedule is based on the policies of the team. When I was taking part in some Apache Software Foundation projects the process went something like this: Team decides on SemVer policy (i.e. what number is coming next) Officers determine when release cycle begins Project lead ...


1

The extremely simplified version of things would be to capture the text from the editor, and send it back to the server. Then on the server save that text into a file on the server. From there, execute the code like you normally would, and capture its output, either in a file, or in a process that then writes the output back to the client. When the client ...


1

The task of ensuring that your software is compliant with open source licenses is not unrealistic, nor is ensuring that your vendors also comply with appropriate open source licenses. The first layer of defense would be a software composition analysis tool. There are several options - Black Duck, FOSSA, and WhiteSource are three examples of what is ...


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