24

It's possible to write asynchronous IO where you tell the OS to dispatch a disk read/write and then go do something else and then later check if it's done. It's far from new. An older method is using another thread for the IO. However that requires that you have something to do while that read is being executed and you will not be allowed to touch the ...


19

The I/O schemes you are describing are in current use in computers. why the CPU actually has to stay there, practically not doing anything else than just waiting for IO? This is the simplest possible I/O method: programmed I/O. Many embedded systems and low/end microprocessors have only a single input instruction and a single output instruction. The ...


9

Have faith that the processing of other stuff while waiting for I/O is quite streamlined, close to as streamlined as possible. When you see that your computer is waiting for I/O only 12.1% of the time, it means that it is in fact doing a lot of other things in parallel. If it really had to wait for I/O without doing anything else, it would be waiting for ...


8

Don’t shoot… I come in peace ;) I can relate to the other side of the coin as I used to be one of those Operations People. Just imagine that you(the Dev) are being pulled into Operation meeting where there is nothing for you to say or relate to and you have to sit there for a number of hours. And the only thing you can think of is you backlog of BAU ...


6

The OS (unless it's a very low level embedded system or something similarly exotic) already takes care of this: if your application has to wait for I/O, it will usually block on that I/O and some other thread or application will become active. The scheduler decides which one. It's only if there is no other thread or application which could be running that ...


5

Yes, this is allowed. In UML, this is called 'redefinition'. To make this explicit, you could add a redefines-constraint to the operation in class B, as follows: +doSomething() {redefines doSomething} If the signatures of both operations are identical (as in this case), the redefines-constraint can be omitted and redefinition is implicit (see sections 9....


5

It does depend upon your application code. I am supposing your code is running on Linux. You could use multi-threading (e.g. POSIX pthreads) to have compute-bound threads doing some computation while other IO-bound threads are doing the IO (and waiting for it). You could even have your application running several processes communicating with inter-process ...


2

Linux packages shipped with a given distribution are usually heavily tested to ensure they work well with the specific distribution. Your company may do an additional step of testing those packages for the scenarios which happen specifically in the company. If you're installing newer versions, you're on your own. It may work well, and it usually does, ...


1

The answer above about finding a common ground would be the best advice, and in keeping with the spirit of devops - but personally, the idea to bring operations and development closer together for me means to stop thinking of personnel as 'dev' or 'ops' in the first place, and to bring everyone's strengths to the fore in terms of improving the overall ...


1

I don't think there is an official(tm) skill set for "OPS" every company will have different responsibilities for the role. However, I would say that normally DEVOPS is not something you do as part of a 'add a new feature to our software' style sprint. If you do "DEVOPS" then your operations environment is in place. As is your build, test and deploy ...


1

Nothing is without risk. In house can fail. Out of house can fail. Backups can fail. Question is, how much is it worth to mitigate these risks? The law of diminishing returns ensures you can spend more on mitigating risk than an actual failure would cost. Be that as it may, you can go as far as maintaining a failover system across multiple providers so ...


1

I add other viewpoint than others, maybe controversial: Its typical problem of Linux operating systems. Lagging specifically (Search for "Linux mouse lag" ). Windows does not have this problem. I have dual boot Windows 7 and Linux Mint. Even when doing intensive disk operation in Windows, Windows feels smoot, mouse is moving normally. In Linux oppositelly ...


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