Hot answers tagged

162

Sobczak isn't talking about corporate ownership. The "half" language that he is missing is all those things that you can't do in many modern languages, even though as a well-educated computer expert he knows they could be made possible: inherit from as many classes as you like. Assign any object to any other without type constraints. Control allocation and ...


34

This is explained quite nicely in the original source of the quote: I decided to learn more about C++ and became its faithful passionate - this includes my interest in the way this language is likely to evolve. Moreover, I've noticed that the most high-end and state-of-the-art techniques are needed to develop useful libraries, not the actual ...


25

From Wikipedia: The ORDER BY clause identifies which columns are used to sort the resulting data, and in which direction they should be sorted (options are ascending or descending). Without an ORDER BY clause, the order of rows returned by an SQL query is undefined. So it's undefined. The SQL specification doesn't state the specific order that ...


23

The article linked to in the blog you posted has been removed, so it's hard to be sure, but as Kilian says, it's likely that when he says "half the language" he means that C# and Java feel like C++ but with a lot of features and constructs removed to make them easier to use or safer. Back in 2006, when this was written, when C# was relatively young and Java ...


14

Personally, I'd go with option 3 because: It is normalized and simple Easy to query for reports Easy to back up(just 1 database to worry about) If you index the table well, performance shouldn't be an issue Also, Performance aside, here are some reasons why you would want to avoid option 1 and 2. Cons if you go with 500 databases, 1 per each customer: ...


12

Looking back at the archives, it appears that this quote was from 2003 (despite the article citing it being from 2006). At that time, C# was in Version 1.x, and it was lacking a lot of its modern features: New features C# 2.0 Generics Partial types Anonymous methods Iterators Nullable types Getter/setter separate accessibility ...


11

It's not a bug, it's acting exactly as specified. With the final byte b1 the compiler is sure that b1 will have the value 9 and -b1 becomes a compile time constant expression. The compiler can then check that the value is still acceptable for a byte and let's you do it. When b1 is not final then -b1 is an expression like any other and as such b1 will be ...


10

Oracle does own the "Java" trademark, but anyone can implement a JVM. From Java Virtual Machine: Oracle, the owner of Java, produces a JVM, but JVMs using the "Java" trademark may be developed by other companies as long as they adhere to the JVM specification published by Oracle and to related contractual obligations. IBM publishes a lot of ...


10

Unless you give technical reasons why you're not satisfied with the current solution, and unless you evaluate the financial side of the rewrite, all you will get here be opinions based on nothing but personal preferences. Which is, needless to say, something no business decision should be based on in general. Edit: To elaborate a bit on the already said, ...


8

Definitely don't name every table with a prefix. I tried that once and it's annoying to maintain and keep straight, especially since some tables apply to multiple sections. I currently work with a system which has no naming prefix for most tables, but there is a naming prefix for modules-specific tables For example, we have the usual Users, Customers, ...


8

How do home builders justify the effort that every wall stud is 16" from each other? How do aircraft engineers justify that bolts/rivets (whatever they use these day) on an aircraft's wing are all evenly spaced? Maybe exact spacing doesn't matter and maybe capitalization doesn't matter but outside of software engineering it is very easy to look at these ...


7

Sun was the creator of the Java programming language, until it was bought by Oracle 2 years ago. Now, as Bill said, Oracle owns the java trademark. On the other hand, Oracle and IBM announced in October 2010 that we will collaborate in the OpenJDK Community to develop the leading open-source Java SE implementation, and make the OpenJDK Community the ...


7

No, large binary files should generally not be stored in the database. Generally, your filesystem will provide better caching/buffering than your database will for large files Databases are generally designed and optimized around smaller bits of data - large binary files are often not optimized for in databases Database storage is generally more expensive (...


6

Oracle "owns" the Java trademark, and, ultimately has the right to decide what can be called Java. However Sun set up the "Java Community Process" which has been continued by Oracle. This is effectively the governing body for "Java" the language, and, the definitions for the various editions: "ME", "SE" and "JE". Leadership is somewhat restricted to major ...


6

Your stated requirements don't show the need for Materialized View. You could use regular views if you want. What will make the real difference is how you code the SQL and how you design the indexes in addition to how much data you fetch in each call to the database. You could even code the logic to combine the tables in stored procs and with single ...


6

The most important reason not to use large blobs is that you cannot stream them - when you query a database, it's the whole column value or nothing. With files, you can open a handle, then read the data as you go - you never need to have the entire file in memory at the same time. At the same time, many of the advantages of databases, such as more efficient ...


6

If you'd like to suggest a feature or report a bug to Oracle, you can do so via their bug report and feature request page. Java's implementation is now managed via the OpenJDK as the official reference implementation. If you want to contribute, you'll need to follow this path, summarized from the page linked: Find something to work on. You seem to have ...


6

Without knowing the full details of what you need, you probably want to do one of the following: Use an existing search tool, like Sphinx or Lucene Perform n-gram approximate matching I don't fully know what's involved installing and configuration sphinx; but, I'm under the impression you can point it at a database, tell it which fields to index, how to ...


5

If there are no security restrictions that prevent that, probably the easiest way is to create a database link, so those two databases see each other; then use the minus clause to find what is in one table but not the other. CREATE DATABASE LINK otherdb CONNECT TO otheruser IDENTIFIED BY otherpwd USING 'otherdb.wherever'; SELECT mycolumn FROM mytable ...


5

http://www.oracle-base.com/articles/12c/identity-columns-in-oracle-12cr1.php The 12c database introduces the ability define an identity clause against a table column defined using a numeric type. The syntax is show below. GENERATED [ ALWAYS | BY DEFAULT [ ON NULL ] ] AS IDENTITY [ ( identity_options ) ]


5

You are correct that XE is limited to one database per server. Technically, you should be able to run multiple VMs on your development box with different XE databases installed on each one and connect to those databases from your application. Of course, both databases would be limited by the other restrictions on XE (1 CPU core, 11 GB of data assuming we'...


5

If the Table of Contents in the front of the book is non-clustered, the page numbering itself (on the actual pages) is the clustered index. The "clustered" nature of an index indicates that the records are stored with the index nodes (or at least in the same order). So, the page-number analogy is actually very accurate in this respect, because like a real ...


5

There's more to evaluate than just performance when considering multitenancy. I'd recommend reading over this MSDN article for more details. Broadly speaking, you need to consider these factors before you settle on a particular approach. System administration costs Database server costs (aka hardware) Database licensing costs (aka software) Complexities ...


5

This is essentially what an Object/Relational Mapping Framework (such as Hibernate) can do for you. It provides a layer on top of the database that abstracts away the details of querying the database by providing a database-independent layer and query language. Hibernate provides (among other ways of querying the database) HQL for this: from Cat as cat left ...


4

I want to cover both some pro- and con- issues with stored procs. We use them extensively with LedgerSMB, and our rule is, with a few very specific extension, "if it's a query, make it a stored proc." Our reason for doing this was to facilitate cross-language query reuse. There isn't a better way to do this honestly. In the end the question is always on ...


4

Considering all the above cases, I would like to add one more. The choice of SP may be depends on people choice as well. I personally feel frustrated when people puts very complex logic in SP and I believe such SP is very complex to maintain and debug. Even many cases the developer himself faces problem when debugging in code behind (say language part) is ...


4

Honestly, you need a far better justification than "We feel it's out of date" to justify spending the amount of money it will cost. What are the problems with the current incarnation?


4

While I agree with all the fellow programmers, I also need to introduce less tangible but nonetheless important aspects to this situation. Software development is relatively young discipline and it changes fast, really fast. What's the average age of your dev team? 45? Imagine hiring college grads to work on your stack, do you foresee any difficulty? Is your ...


4

The most obvious drawback to a materialized view is its effect on inserts, updates, and deletes, or as a result of them. If your database is non-volatile, this is a non-issue. The second issue would be future maintenance--a change in requirements for the html table would require you to revise the JSP, your POJOs, your SQL, and your view. If you were to ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible