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153 votes

Team constantly fails to meet sprint goals

You should first ask, 'who cares'? Completing sprints feels good, and in some companies results in cookies from the scrum parent. But the ultimate test is whether the company is meeting its goals. ...
bmargulies's user avatar
  • 1,707
129 votes

Team constantly fails to meet sprint goals

Am I missing something? YES! You went 18 months - or somewhere in the neighborhood of 36 sprints with retrospectives, but somehow couldn't fix it? Management didn't hold the team accountable, and ...
Telastyn's user avatar
  • 109k
61 votes

Team constantly fails to meet sprint goals

My question is basically: when is it fair to look for the problem in the quality of the developers There isn't enough information in your post to answer that question. There's no way to know if they ...
Bryan Oakley's user avatar
  • 25.3k
58 votes
Accepted

How much time should you spend planning a commit before writing code?

Firstly: when coding for a living, especially as a junior in a team, typically not much design work is needed. This is because you'll be working in an existing code base. Chances are, you'll often be ...
tjalling's user avatar
  • 684
45 votes

How much time should you spend planning a commit before writing code?

I would like to change your perspective for a moment. Commits are not something you plan. Commits, especially in the early stages of figuring out a problem, are little more than save-points along a ...
Greg Burghardt's user avatar
28 votes
Accepted

How can you decide how much detail is it worth going in to when planning a new feature?

There's no one-size-fits-all answer to this. It's highly context sensitive. One of the biggest factors is risk. You want to do just enough up-front design and planning to bring the risk to a tolerable ...
Thomas Owens's user avatar
  • 82.8k
28 votes

How much time should you spend planning a commit before writing code?

You mention live stream YouTubers as a standard to live up to, as if they would make up stuff on the spot, type it in and are done. That is not how it goes. They planned and practiced too beforehand ...
Martin Maat's user avatar
  • 18.4k
24 votes
Accepted

How to deal with sprint planning running far too long?

You're right - 5 hours in Sprint Planning for a 1 week Sprint does seem like a long time. The Scrum Guide time-boxes Sprint Planning to 8 hours for 1 month Sprints and says that "for shorter Sprints, ...
Thomas Owens's user avatar
  • 82.8k
17 votes

Team constantly fails to meet sprint goals

You say you "use retrospectives." But what does the team actually do in these retrospectives? Since you've gone 18 months without once addressing this aspect of your process, I'm guessing the answer ...
Zach Lipton's user avatar
  • 1,608
13 votes

Are bargaining and beat down attempts on Scrum estimations legitimate parts of the process?

The situation you describe is toxic. This sort of bargaining ignores reality and the expertise of the team, it willfully conceals information from the team and organization at large, and it inhibits ...
Jonah's user avatar
  • 756
13 votes

How can you decide how much detail is it worth going in to when planning a new feature?

This boils down to time management and a measured approach to risk. First consider where your stakeholders stand -- While not universally true, it's typically the case that stakeholders prefer the ...
Ben Cottrell's user avatar
  • 11.8k
12 votes

In agile, how are basic infrastructure tasks at the start of a project planned and allocated using strict management frameworks like TFS online?

I like the other answers that say to put as much "tooling" code as you can into Iteration 0. However, sometimes, these kinds of tools come up after the project has already started. Perhaps in ...
GHP's user avatar
  • 4,441
11 votes

Convincing "agile" product managers of the value of planning

There are a couple of key points to get out of the way: Agile != lazy development Spikes and Prototypes are not interchangable ideas Nothing that you described above is prescribed by agile or scrum ...
Daniel's user avatar
  • 2,041
10 votes
Accepted

Where and when do design, architecture activities take place in Scrum

Design should be planned for, either as enough extra story points per story or as a separate story. And you should still have designers on your team who own and monitor the design. The trouble is ...
Martin Maat's user avatar
  • 18.4k
10 votes
Accepted

Difference between a Software Requirement, a Feature and an Objective

About the terminology: A requirement expresses a need or a constraint that the system has to fulfil, in principle independently of the solution that will be chosen. Examples: "The system shall ...
Christophe's user avatar
  • 77.9k
10 votes

How much time should you spend planning a commit before writing code?

At the moment I'm spending more time planning out a commit than actually writing code No one cares how you spent your time. They care about what you made (if you're lucky). This is making me unhappy,...
candied_orange's user avatar
9 votes
Accepted

Should there be a gap between sprints?

There is no gap between sprints. After the Review and Retro, the next thing is the next sprint's planning. Now, what you describe doesn't sound like a gap as much as it is a 12-day sprint instead of a ...
Daniel's user avatar
  • 2,041
9 votes

How can you decide how much detail is it worth going in to when planning a new feature?

There are projects for which that's a totally valid approach. Safety-critical ones, for example. You've already spotted that the deep dive process lets you identify risks earlier. The challenge is to ...
pjc50's user avatar
  • 13.6k
8 votes

Are bargaining and beat down attempts on Scrum estimations legitimate parts of the process?

In my opinion, one of the greatest achievements of SCRUM is the development of story points, with the expressed explicit intent of avoiding the bargaining issues mentioned here. The whole point of ...
Cort Ammon's user avatar
  • 11.2k
8 votes

Do "almost finished" tasks or stories justify planning with overload in the next sprint?

Do not try to make your velocity look better than it is. The way forward is to acknowledge that the task was not completed you overestimated what you could do in the sprint and failed. But that is ...
Bent's user avatar
  • 2,576
8 votes

Where and when do design, architecture activities take place in Scrum

Robert C. Martin had a talk about that you can find on youtube: The land Scrum forgot There he adresses this common issue that in Scrum architecture and design is never mentioned so it is up to the ...
oopexpert's user avatar
  • 779
7 votes

How much time should you spend planning a commit before writing code?

If I don't do this amount of planning, I just end up writing code that will have to be undone before I commit, and this just messes up my project, because don't like wasting any code I've already ...
Ray's user avatar
  • 209
7 votes

How much time should you spend planning a commit before writing code?

You're discovering the difference between "programming" and "development". Developing an application is so much more than churning out some code. All the different little units of ...
James D's user avatar
  • 413
6 votes
Accepted

Is there a reason beyond Fibonacci why Planning Poker doesn't involve a 4?

If you think that estimating a story as a 4 rather than a 5 adds value to the planning process, I think you misunderstand the point of the planning process. There is no value in having a highly ...
Bryan Oakley's user avatar
  • 25.3k
6 votes
Accepted

How to get started with Scrum when the team is bad at generating ideas?

What I think you lack here is a product owner. Somebody who knows about the product you guys are working on and who can make sure that the user stories that end up in your backlog meet DoR (Definition ...
Vladimir Stokic's user avatar
6 votes

In agile, how are basic infrastructure tasks at the start of a project planned and allocated using strict management frameworks like TFS online?

If it's infrastructure it's typically put into Iteration Zero. What's Iteration Zero? It's typically the time between kickoff and planning before actual iterations start. An example, say we need a ...
Jon Raynor's user avatar
  • 11.5k
6 votes
Accepted

Do "almost finished" tasks or stories justify planning with overload in the next sprint?

When a story isn't done at the end of the sprint, then the points of the story don't count towards the velocity of that sprint and the story goes back onto the backlog. If during the planning of the ...
Bart van Ingen Schenau's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

Developing a web app from a design, how should I split the work up?

There won't be any one single answer to this, although there seem to be those that think there is. They may be right, but my gut says "nope". Here are some opening thoughts. I) General Goals for Life ...
jgenoese's user avatar
6 votes

How to deal with sprint planning running far too long?

I hear you. That's too long to spend! Hopefully, your team is discussing this in your retrospectives. We tried several experiments with mixed results: Everyone does a high-level design on a single ...
Jason Zinschlag's user avatar

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